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Joseph Bardin

Joseph Bardin

Joseph Bardin is a research Scientist with the Google AI Quantum team, focusing on integrated electronics for quantum computing. He received the PhD from Caltech in 2009 and joined the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 2010, where, in addition to his Google appointment, he is currently a full professor. He has received numerous awards including the 2016 UMass Amherst Award for Outstanding Accomplishments in Research and Creative Activity and the 2020 Microwave Theory and Techniques Outstanding Young Engineer Award.
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    Readout of a quantum processor with high dynamic range Josephson parametric amplifiers
    Aaron Shorter
    Alejandro Grajales Dau
    Alex Crook
    Alex Opremcak
    Alexander Korotkov
    Alexander Lill
    Alexandre Bourassa
    Alexis Morvan
    Alfredo Torres
    Andrew Dunsworth
    Ani Nersisyan
    Anthony Megrant
    Ashley Anne Huff
    Ben Curtin
    Benjamin Chiaro
    Bob Benjamin Buckley
    Brooks Riley Foxen
    Charles Neill
    Christopher Schuster
    Dave Landhuis
    Ebrahim Forati
    Fedor Kostritsa
    Frank Carlton Arute
    Grayson Robert Young
    Jamie Yao
    Jeremy Patterson Hilton
    Jimmy Chen
    JiunHow Ng
    John Mark Kreikebaum
    Josh Godfrey Cogan
    Juhwan Yoo
    Justin Thomas Iveland
    Kannan Aryaperumal Sankaragomathi
    Kenny Lee
    Kunal Arya
    Leon Brill
    Lily MeeKit Laws
    Marco Szalay
    Marika Kieferova
    Markus Ansmann
    Michael C. Hamilton
    Mike Shearn
    Murray Nguyen
    Nicholas Bushnell
    Ningfeng Zhu
    Pavel Laptev
    Ping Yeh
    Rajeev Acharya
    Rebecca Potter
    Reza Fatemi
    Roberto Collins
    Sean Harrington
    Shirin Montazeri
    Tim Burger
    Trent Huang
    Trevor Johnathan Mccourt
    Vladimir Shvarts
    Wayne Liu
    William Giang
    Xiao Mi
    Yu Chen
    Applied Physics Letters, vol. 122 (2023), pp. 014001
    Preview abstract We demonstrate a high dynamic range Josephson parametric amplifier (JPA) in which the active nonlinear element is implemented using an array of rf-SQUIDs. The device is matched to the 50 $\Omega$ environment with a Klopfenstein-taper impedance transformer and achieves a bandwidth of 250-300 MHz, with input saturation powers up to $-95$~dBm at 20 dB gain. A 54-qubit Sycamore processor was used to benchmark these devices, providing a calibration for readout power, an estimate of amplifier added noise, and a platform for comparison against standard impedance matched parametric amplifiers with a single dc-SQUID. We find that the high power rf-SQUID array design has no adverse effect on system noise, readout fidelity, and qubit dephasing, and we estimate an upper bound on amplifier added noise at 1.6 times the quantum limit. Lastly, amplifiers with this design show no degradation in readout fidelity due to gain compression, which can occur in multi-tone multiplexed readout with traditional JPAs. View details
    Purification-Based Quantum Error Mitigation of Pair-Correlated Electron Simulations
    Thomas E O'Brien
    Gian-Luca R. Anselmetti
    Fotios Gkritsis
    Vincent Elfving
    Stefano Polla
    William J. Huggins
    Oumarou Oumarou
    Kostyantyn Kechedzhi
    Dmitry Abanin
    Rajeev Acharya
    Igor Aleiner
    Richard Ross Allen
    Trond Ikdahl Andersen
    Kyle Anderson
    Markus Ansmann
    Frank Carlton Arute
    Kunal Arya
    Juan Atalaya
    Michael Blythe Broughton
    Bob Benjamin Buckley
    Alexandre Bourassa
    Leon Brill
    Tim Burger
    Nicholas Bushnell
    Jimmy Chen
    Yu Chen
    Benjamin Chiaro
    Desmond Chun Fung Chik
    Josh Godfrey Cogan
    Roberto Collins
    Paul Conner
    William Courtney
    Alex Crook
    Ben Curtin
    Ilya Drozdov
    Andrew Dunsworth
    Daniel Eppens
    Lara Faoro
    Edward Farhi
    Reza Fatemi
    Ebrahim Forati
    Brooks Riley Foxen
    William Giang
    Dar Gilboa
    Alejandro Grajales Dau
    Steve Habegger
    Michael C. Hamilton
    Sean Harrington
    Jeremy Patterson Hilton
    Trent Huang
    Ashley Anne Huff
    Sergei Isakov
    Justin Thomas Iveland
    Cody Jones
    Pavol Juhas
    Marika Kieferova
    Andrey Klots
    Alexander Korotkov
    Fedor Kostritsa
    John Mark Kreikebaum
    Dave Landhuis
    Pavel Laptev
    Kim Ming Lau
    Lily MeeKit Laws
    Joonho Lee
    Kenny Lee
    Alexander T. Lill
    Wayne Liu
    Orion Martin
    Trevor Johnathan Mccourt
    Anthony Megrant
    Xiao Mi
    Masoud Mohseni
    Shirin Montazeri
    Alexis Morvan
    Ramis Movassagh
    Wojtek Mruczkiewicz
    Charles Neill
    Ani Nersisyan
    Michael Newman
    Jiun How Ng
    Murray Nguyen
    Alex Opremcak
    Andre Gregory Petukhov
    Rebecca Potter
    Kannan Aryaperumal Sankaragomathi
    Christopher Schuster
    Mike Shearn
    Aaron Shorter
    Vladimir Shvarts
    Jindra Skruzny
    Vadim Smelyanskiy
    Clarke Smith
    Rolando Diego Somma
    Doug Strain
    Marco Szalay
    Alfredo Torres
    Guifre Vidal
    Jamie Yao
    Ping Yeh
    Juhwan Yoo
    Grayson Robert Young
    Yaxing Zhang
    Ningfeng Zhu
    Christian Gogolin
    Nature Physics (2023)
    Preview abstract An important measure of the development of quantum computing platforms has been the simulation of increasingly complex physical systems. Prior to fault-tolerant quantum computing, robust error mitigation strategies are necessary to continue this growth. Here, we study physical simulation within the seniority-zero electron pairing subspace, which affords both a computational stepping stone to a fully correlated model, and an opportunity to validate recently introduced ``purification-based'' error-mitigation strategies. We compare the performance of error mitigation based on doubling quantum resources in time (echo verification) or in space (virtual distillation), on up to 20 qubits of a superconducting qubit quantum processor. We observe a reduction of error by one to two orders of magnitude below less sophisticated techniques (e.g. post-selection); the gain from error mitigation is seen to increase with the system size. Employing these error mitigation strategies enables the implementation of the largest variational algorithm for a correlated chemistry system to-date. Extrapolating performance from these results allows us to estimate minimum requirements for a beyond-classical simulation of electronic structure. We find that, despite the impressive gains from purification-based error mitigation, significant hardware improvements will be required for classically intractable variational chemistry simulations. View details
    Measurement-induced entanglement and teleportation on a noisy quantum processor
    Jesse Hoke
    Matteo Ippoliti
    Dmitry Abanin
    Rajeev Acharya
    Trond Andersen
    Markus Ansmann
    Frank Arute
    Kunal Arya
    Juan Atalaya
    Gina Bortoli
    Alexandre Bourassa
    Leon Brill
    Michael Broughton
    Bob Buckley
    Tim Burger
    Nicholas Bushnell
    Jimmy Chen
    Benjamin Chiaro
    Desmond Chik
    Josh Cogan
    Roberto Collins
    Paul Conner
    William Courtney
    Alex Crook
    Ben Curtin
    Alejo Grajales Dau
    Agustin Di Paolo
    ILYA Drozdov
    Andrew Dunsworth
    Daniel Eppens
    Edward Farhi
    Reza Fatemi
    Vinicius Ferreira
    Ebrahim Forati
    Brooks Foxen
    William Giang
    Dar Gilboa
    Raja Gosula
    Steve Habegger
    Michael Hamilton
    Monica Hansen
    Paula Heu
    Trent Huang
    Ashley Huff
    Bill Huggins
    Sergei Isakov
    Justin Iveland
    Cody Jones
    Pavol Juhas
    Kostyantyn Kechedzhi
    Marika Kieferova
    Alexei Kitaev
    Andrey Klots
    Alexander Korotkov
    Fedor Kostritsa
    John Mark Kreikebaum
    Dave Landhuis
    Pavel Laptev
    Kim Ming Lau
    Lily Laws
    Joonho Lee
    Kenny Lee
    Yuri Lensky
    Alexander Lill
    Wayne Liu
    Orion Martin
    Amanda Mieszala
    Shirin Montazeri
    Alexis Morvan
    Ramis Movassagh
    Wojtek Mruczkiewicz
    Charles Neill
    Ani Nersisyan
    Michael Newman
    JiunHow Ng
    Murray Ich Nguyen
    Tom O'Brien
    Seun Omonije
    Alex Opremcak
    Andre Petukhov
    Rebecca Potter
    Leonid Pryadko
    Charles Rocque
    Negar Saei
    Kannan Sankaragomathi
    Henry Schurkus
    Christopher Schuster
    Mike Shearn
    Aaron Shorter
    Noah Shutty
    Vladimir Shvarts
    Jindra Skruzny
    Clarke Smith
    Rolando Somma
    George Sterling
    Doug Strain
    Marco Szalay
    Alfredo Torres
    Guifre Vidal
    Cheng Xing
    Jamie Yao
    Ping Yeh
    Juhwan Yoo
    Grayson Young
    Yaxing Zhang
    Ningfeng Zhu
    Jeremy Hilton
    Anthony Megrant
    Yu Chen
    Vadim Smelyanskiy
    Xiao Mi
    Vedika Khemani
    Nature, vol. 622 (2023), 481–486
    Preview abstract Measurement has a special role in quantum theory: by collapsing the wavefunction, it can enable phenomena such as teleportation and thereby alter the ‘arrow of time’ that constrains unitary evolution. When integrated in many-body dynamics, measurements can lead to emergent patterns of quantum information in space–time that go beyond the established paradigms for characterizing phases, either in or out of equilibrium. For present-day noisy intermediate-scale quantum (NISQ) processors, the experimental realization of such physics can be problematic because of hardware limitations and the stochastic nature of quantum measurement. Here we address these experimental challenges and study measurement-induced quantum information phases on up to 70 superconducting qubits. By leveraging the interchangeability of space and time, we use a duality mapping to avoid mid-circuit measurement and access different manifestations of the underlying phases, from entanglement scaling to measurement-induced teleportation. We obtain finite-sized signatures of a phase transition with a decoding protocol that correlates the experimental measurement with classical simulation data. The phases display remarkably different sensitivity to noise, and we use this disparity to turn an inherent hardware limitation into a useful diagnostic. Our work demonstrates an approach to realizing measurement-induced physics at scales that are at the limits of current NISQ processors. View details
    Josephson parametric amplifier with Chebyshev gain profile and high saturation
    Ryan Kaufman
    Mark Dykman
    Andrea Iorio
    George Sterling
    Alex Opremcak
    Lara Faoro
    Tim Burger
    Robert Gasca
    Physical Review Applied, vol. 20 (2023), pp. 054058
    Preview abstract We demonstrate a Josephson parametric amplifier design with a band-pass impedance matching network based on a third-order Chebyshev prototype. We measured eight amplifiers operating at 4.6~GHz that exhibit gains of 20~dB with less than 1~dB gain ripple and up to 500~MHz bandwidth. The amplifiers further achieve high input saturation powers around $-93$~dBm based on the use of rf-SQUID arrays as their nonlinear element. We characterize the amplifiers' readout efficiency and their signal-to-noise ratio near saturation using a Sycamore processor. In addition, we measure the amplifiers intermodulation distortion in two-tone experiments as a function of input power and inter-tone detuning, and observe excess distortion at small detuning with a pronounced dip as a function of signal power, which we interpret in terms of power-dependent dielectric losses. View details
    Noise-resilient Majorana Edge Modes on a Chain of Superconducting Qubits
    Alejandro Grajales Dau
    Alex Crook
    Alex Opremcak
    Alexa Rubinov
    Alexander Korotkov
    Alexandre Bourassa
    Alexei Kitaev
    Alexis Morvan
    Andre Gregory Petukhov
    Andrew Dunsworth
    Andrey Klots
    Anthony Megrant
    Ashley Anne Huff
    Benjamin Chiaro
    Bernardo Meurer Costa
    Bob Benjamin Buckley
    Brooks Foxen
    Charles Neill
    Christopher Schuster
    Cody Jones
    Daniel Eppens
    Dar Gilboa
    Dave Landhuis
    Dmitry Abanin
    Doug Strain
    Ebrahim Forati
    Edward Farhi
    Fedor Kostritsa
    Frank Carlton Arute
    Guifre Vidal
    Igor Aleiner
    Jamie Yao
    Jeremy Patterson Hilton
    Joao Basso
    John Mark Kreikebaum
    Joonho Lee
    Juan Atalaya
    Juhwan Yoo
    Justin Thomas Iveland
    Kannan Aryaperumal Sankaragomathi
    Kenny Lee
    Kim Ming Lau
    Kostyantyn Kechedzhi
    Kunal Arya
    Lara Faoro
    Leon Brill
    Marco Szalay
    Masoud Mohseni
    Michael Blythe Broughton
    Michael Newman
    Michel Henri Devoret
    Mike Shearn
    Nicholas Bushnell
    Orion Martin
    Paul Conner
    Pavel Laptev
    Ping Yeh
    Rajeev Acharya
    Rebecca Potter
    Reza Fatemi
    Roberto Collins
    Sergei Isakov
    Shirin Montazeri
    Steve Habegger
    Thomas E O'Brien
    Trent Huang
    Trond Ikdahl Andersen
    Vadim Smelyanskiy
    Vladimir Shvarts
    Wayne Liu
    William Courtney
    William Giang
    William J. Huggins
    Wojtek Mruczkiewicz
    Xiao Mi
    Yaxing Zhang
    Yu Chen
    Yuan Su
    Zijun Chen
    Science (2022) (to appear)
    Preview abstract Inherent symmetry of a quantum system may protect its otherwise fragile states. Leveraging such protection requires testing its robustness against uncontrolled environmental interactions. Using 47 superconducting qubits, we implement the kicked Ising model which exhibits Majorana edge modes (MEMs) protected by a $\mathbb{Z}_2$-symmetry. Remarkably, we find that any multi-qubit Pauli operator overlapping with the MEMs exhibits a uniform decay rate comparable to single-qubit relaxation rates, irrespective of its size or composition. This finding allows us to accurately reconstruct the exponentially localized spatial profiles of the MEMs. Spectroscopic measurements further indicate exponentially suppressed hybridization between the MEMs over larger system sizes, which manifests as a strong resilience against low-frequency noise. Our work elucidates the noise sensitivity of symmetry-protected edge modes in a solid-state environment. View details
    Microwaves in Quantum Computing
    Daniel Slichter
    David Reilly
    IEEE Journal of Microwaves, vol. 1 (2021)
    Preview abstract The growing field of quantum computing relies on a broad range of microwave technologies, and has spurred development of microwave devices and methods in new operating regimes. Here we review the use of microwave signals and systems in quantum computing, with specific reference to three leading quantum computing platforms: trapped atomic ion qubits, spin qubits in semiconductors, and superconducting qubits. We highlight some key results and progress in quantum computing achieved through the use of microwave systems, and discuss how quantum computing applications have pushed the frontiers of microwave technology in some areas. We also describe open microwave engineering challenges for the construction of large-scale, fault-tolerant quantum computers. View details
    Realizing topologically ordered states on a quantum processor
    Y.-J. Liu
    A. Smith
    C. Knapp
    M. Newman
    N. C. Jones
    Z. Chen
    X. Mi
    A. Dunsworth
    I. Aleiner
    F. Arute
    K. Arya
    J. Atalaya
    R. Barends
    J. Basso
    M. Broughton
    B. B. Buckley
    N. Bushnell
    B. Chiaro
    R. Collins
    W. Courtney
    A. R Derk
    D. Eppens
    L. Faoro
    E. Farhi
    B. Foxen
    A. Greene
    S. D. Harrington
    J. Hilton
    T. Huang
    W. J. Huggins
    S. V. Isakov
    K. Kechedzhi
    A. N. Korotkov
    F. Kostritsa
    D. Landhuis
    P. Laptev
    O. Martin
    M. Mohseni
    S. Montazeri
    W. Mruczkiewicz
    J. Mutus
    C. Neill
    T. E. O'Brien
    A. Opremcak
    B. Pato
    A. Petukhov
    V. Shvarts
    D. Strain
    M. Szalay
    Z. Yao
    P. Yeh
    J. Yoo
    A. Megrant
    Y. Chen
    V. Smelyanskiy
    A. Kitaev
    M. Knap
    F. Pollmann
    Science, vol. 374 (2021), pp. 1237-1241
    Preview abstract The discovery of topological order has revolutionized the understanding of quantum matter in modern physics and provided the theoretical foundation for many quantum error correcting codes. Realizing topologically ordered states has proven to be extremely challenging in both condensed matter and synthetic quantum systems. Here, we prepare the ground state of the emblematic toric code Hamiltonian using an efficient quantum circuit on a superconducting quantum processor. We measure a topological entanglement entropy of Stopo ≈ −0.95 × ln 2 and simulate anyon interferometry to extract the braiding statistics of the emergent excitations. Furthermore, we investigate key aspects of the surface code, including logical state injection and the decay of the non-local order parameter. Our results illustrate the topological nature of these states and demonstrate their potential for implementing the surface code. View details
    Tuning Quantum Information Scrambling on a 53-Qubit Processor
    Alan Derk
    Alan Ho
    Alex Opremcak
    Alexander Korotkov
    Alexandre Bourassa
    Andre Gregory Petukhov
    Andrew Dunsworth
    Anthony Megrant
    Bálint Pató
    Benjamin Chiaro
    Brooks Riley Foxen
    Charles Neill
    Cody Jones
    Daniel Eppens
    Dave Landhuis
    Doug Strain
    Edward Farhi
    Eric Ostby
    Fedor Kostritsa
    Frank Carlton Arute
    Igor Aleiner
    Jamie Yao
    Jeffrey Marshall
    Jeremy Patterson Hilton
    Jimmy Chen
    Josh Mutus
    Juan Atalaya
    Kostyantyn Kechedzhi
    Kunal Arya
    Marco Szalay
    Masoud Mohseni
    Matt Trevithick
    Michael Blythe Broughton
    Michael Newman
    Nicholas Bushnell
    Nicholas Redd
    Orion Martin
    Pavel Laptev
    Ping Yeh
    Rami Barends
    Roberto Collins
    Salvatore Mandra
    Sean Harrington
    Sergei Isakov
    Thomas E O'Brien
    Trent Huang
    Trevor Mccourt
    Vadim Smelyanskiy
    Vladimir Shvarts
    William Courtney
    Wojtek Mruczkiewicz
    Xiao Mi
    Yu Chen
    arXiv (2021)
    Preview abstract As entanglement in a quantum system grows, initially localized quantum information is spread into the exponentially many degrees of freedom of the entire system. This process, known as quantum scrambling, is computationally intensive to study classically and lies at the heart of several modern physics conundrums. Here, we characterize scrambling of different quantum circuits on a 53-qubit programmable quantum processor by measuring their out-of-time-order correlators (OTOCs). We observe that the spatiotemporal spread of OTOCs, as well as their circuit-to-circuit fluctuation, unravel in detail the time-scale and extent of quantum scrambling. Comparison with numerical results indicates a high OTOC measurement accuracy despite the large size of the quantum system. Our work establishes OTOC as an experimental tool to diagnose quantum scrambling at the threshold of being classically inaccessible. View details
    Resolving catastrophic error bursts from cosmic rays in large arrays of superconducting qubits
    Lara Faoro
    Kunal Arya
    Andrew Dunsworth
    Trent Huang
    Frank Arute
    Bob B. Buckley
    Nicholas Bushnell
    Jimmy Chen
    Roberto Collins
    Alan R. Derk
    Sean Harrington
    Fedor Kostritsa
    Pavel Laptev
    Xiao Mi
    Shirin Montazeri
    Josh Mutus
    Charles Neill
    Alex Opremcak
    Nicholas Redd
    Vladimir Shvarts
    Jamie Yao
    Ping Yeh
    Juhwan Yoo
    Yu Chen
    Vadim Smelyanskiy
    John Martinis
    Anthony Megrant
    Rami Barends
    Nature Physics (2021)
    Preview abstract Scalable quantum computing can become a reality with error correction, provided that coherent qubits can be constructed in large arrays. The key premise is that physical errors can remain both small and sufficiently uncorrelated as devices scale, so that logical error rates can be exponentially suppressed. However, impacts from cosmic rays and latent radioactivity violate these assumptions. An impinging particle can ionize the substrate and induce a burst of quasiparticles that destroys qubit coherence throughout the device. High-energy radiation has been identified as a source of error in pilot superconducting quantum devices, but the effect on large-scale algorithms and error correction remains an open question. Elucidating the physics involved requires operating large numbers of qubits at the same rapid timescales necessary for error correction. Here, we use space- and time-resolved measurements of a large-scale quantum processor to identify bursts of quasiparticles produced by high-energy rays. We track the events from their initial localized impact as they spread, simultaneously and severely limiting the energy coherence of all qubits and causing chip-wide failure. Our results provide direct insights into the impact of these damaging error bursts and highlight the necessity of mitigation to enable quantum computing to scale. View details
    Exponential suppression of bit or phase flip errors with repetitive quantum error correction
    Rami Barends
    Roberto Collins
    Sean Harrington
    Sergei Isakov
    Thomas E O'Brien
    Trent Huang
    Trevor Mccourt
    Vadim Smelyanskiy
    Vladimir Shvarts
    William Courtney
    Wojtek Mruczkiewicz
    Xiao Mi
    Yu Chen
    Alan Derk
    Alan Ho
    Alex Opremcak
    Alexander Korotkov
    Alexandre Bourassa
    Andre Gregory Petukhov
    Andrew Dunsworth
    Anthony Megrant
    Bálint Pató
    Benjamin Chiaro
    Brooks Riley Foxen
    Charles Neill
    Cody Jones
    Daniel Eppens
    Dave Landhuis
    Doug Strain
    Edward Farhi
    Eric Ostby
    Fedor Kostritsa
    Frank Carlton Arute
    Igor Aleiner
    Jamie Yao
    Jeremy Patterson Hilton
    Jimmy Chen
    Josh Mutus
    Juan Atalaya
    Kostyantyn Kechedzhi
    Kunal Arya
    Marco Szalay
    Masoud Mohseni
    Matt Trevithick
    Michael Broughton
    Michael Newman
    Nicholas Bushnell
    Nicholas Redd
    Orion Martin
    Pavel Laptev
    Ping Yeh
    Nature (2021)
    Preview abstract Realizing the potential of quantum computing will require achieving sufficiently low logical error rates. Many applications call for error rates below 10^-15, but state-of-the-art quantum platforms typically have physical error rates near 10^-3. Quantum error correction (QEC) promises to bridge this divide by distributing quantum logical information across many physical qubits so that errors can be corrected. Logical errors are then exponentially suppressed as the number of physical qubits grows, provided that the physical error rates are below a certain threshold. QEC also requires that the errors are local, and that performance is maintained over many rounds of error correction, a major outstanding experimental challenge. Here, we implement 1D repetition codes embedded in a 2D grid of superconducting qubits which demonstrate exponential suppression of bit or phase-flip errors, reducing logical error per round by more than 100x when increasing the number of qubits from 5 to 21. Crucially, this error suppression is stable over 50 rounds of error correction. We also introduce a method for analyzing error correlations with high precision, and characterize the locality of errors in a device performing QEC for the first time. Finally, we perform error detection using a small 2D surface code logical qubit on the same device, and show that the results from both 1D and 2D codes agree with numerical simulations using a simple depolarizing error model. These findings demonstrate that superconducting qubits are on a viable path towards fault tolerant quantum computing. View details
    Quantum Approximate Optimization of Non-Planar Graph Problems on a Planar Superconducting Processor
    Kevin Jeffery Sung
    Frank Carlton Arute
    Kunal Arya
    Juan Atalaya
    Rami Barends
    Michael Blythe Broughton
    Bob Benjamin Buckley
    Nicholas Bushnell
    Jimmy Chen
    Yu Chen
    Ben Chiaro
    Roberto Collins
    William Courtney
    Andrew Dunsworth
    Brooks Riley Foxen
    Rob Graff
    Steve Habegger
    Sergei Isakov
    Cody Jones
    Kostyantyn Kechedzhi
    Alexander Korotkov
    Fedor Kostritsa
    Dave Landhuis
    Pavel Laptev
    Martin Leib
    Mike Lindmark
    Orion Martin
    John Martinis
    Anthony Megrant
    Xiao Mi
    Masoud Mohseni
    Wojtek Mruczkiewicz
    Josh Mutus
    Charles Neill
    Florian Neukart
    Thomas E O'Brien
    Bryan O'Gorman
    A.G. Petukhov
    Harry Putterman
    Andrea Skolik
    Vadim Smelyanskiy
    Doug Strain
    Michael Streif
    Marco Szalay
    Amit Vainsencher
    Jamie Yao
    Leo Zhou
    Edward Farhi
    Nature Physics (2021)
    Preview abstract Faster algorithms for combinatorial optimization could prove transformative for diverse areas such as logistics, finance and machine learning. Accordingly, the possibility of quantum enhanced optimization has driven much interest in quantum technologies. Here we demonstrate the application of the Google Sycamore superconducting qubit quantum processor to combinatorial optimization problems with the quantum approximate optimization algorithm (QAOA). Like past QAOA experiments, we study performance for problems defined on the planar connectivity graph native to our hardware; however, we also apply the QAOA to the Sherrington–Kirkpatrick model and MaxCut, non-native problems that require extensive compilation to implement. For hardware-native problems, which are classically efficient to solve on average, we obtain an approximation ratio that is independent of problem size and observe that performance increases with circuit depth. For problems requiring compilation, performance decreases with problem size. Circuits involving several thousand gates still present an advantage over random guessing but not over some efficient classical algorithms. Our results suggest that it will be challenging to scale near-term implementations of the QAOA for problems on non-native graphs. As these graphs are closer to real-world instances, we suggest more emphasis should be placed on such problems when using the QAOA to benchmark quantum processors. View details
    Demonstrating a Continuous Set of Two-qubit Gates for Near-term Quantum Algorithms
    Brooks Riley Foxen
    Charles Neill
    Andrew Dunsworth
    Ben Chiaro
    Anthony Megrant
    Jimmy Chen
    Rami Barends
    Frank Carlton Arute
    Kunal Arya
    Yu Chen
    Roberto Collins
    Edward Farhi
    Rob Graff
    Trent Huang
    Sergei Isakov
    Kostyantyn Kechedzhi
    Alexander Korotkov
    Fedor Kostritsa
    Dave Landhuis
    Xiao Mi
    Masoud Mohseni
    Josh Mutus
    Vadim Smelyanskiy
    Amit Vainsencher
    Jamie Yao
    John Martinis
    arXiv:2001.08343 (2020)
    Preview abstract Quantum algorithms offer a dramatic speedup for computational problems in machine learning, material science, and chemistry. However, any near-term realizations of these algorithms will need to be heavily optimized to fit within the finite resources offered by existing noisy quantum hardware. Here, taking advantage of the strong adjustable coupling of gmon qubits, we demonstrate a continuous two qubit gate set that can provide a 5x reduction in circuit depth. We implement two gate families: an iSWAP-like gate to attain an arbitrary swap angle, $\theta$, and a CPHASE gate that generates an arbitrary conditional phase, $\phi$. Using one of each of these gates, we can perform an arbitrary two qubit gate within the excitation-preserving subspace allowing for a complete implementation of the so-called Fermionic Simulation, or fSim, gate set. We benchmark the fidelity of the iSWAP-like and CPHASE gate families as well as 525 other fSim gates spread evenly across the entire fSim($\theta$, $\phi$) parameter space achieving purity-limited average two qubit Pauli error of $3.8 \times 10^{-3}$ per fSim gate. View details
    A Low-Power CMOS Quantum Controller for Transmon Qubits
    Proceedings of the 2020 IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM)
    Preview abstract The development of large-scale quantum computers will require the implementation of scalable control and measurement electronics, which may have to operate at a temperature as low as 4 K. In this paper, we review a first-generation control IC that has been implemented for use with transmon qubits. We first explain the requirements which such an IC must meet and then present the circuit design. We then describe a series of quantum control experiments. The paper concludes with a discussion of future work. View details
    Accurately computing electronic properties of materials using eigenenergies
    Alan Derk
    Alan Ho
    Alex Opremcak
    Alexander Korotkov
    Andre Gregory Petukhov
    Andrew Dunsworth
    Anthony Megrant
    Bálint Pató
    Benjamin Chiaro
    Bob Benjamin Buckley
    Brooks Riley Foxen
    Charles Neill
    Cody Jones
    Daniel Eppens
    Dave Landhuis
    Doug Strain
    Edward Farhi
    Eric Ostby
    Fedor Kostritsa
    Frank Carlton Arute
    Igor Aleiner
    Jamie Yao
    Jeremy Patterson Hilton
    Jimmy Chen
    Josh Mutus
    Juan Atalaya
    Juan Campero
    Kostyantyn Kechedzhi
    Kunal Arya
    Marco Szalay
    Masoud Mohseni
    Matt Jacob-Mitos
    Matt Trevithick
    Michael Blythe Broughton
    Michael Newman
    Nicholas Bushnell
    Nicholas Redd
    Orion Martin
    Pavel Laptev
    Ping Yeh
    Rami Barends
    Roberto Collins
    Sean Harrington
    Sergei Isakov
    Thomas E O'Brien
    Trent Huang
    Trevor Mccourt
    Vadim Smelyanskiy
    Vladimir Shvarts
    William Courtney
    William J. Huggins
    Wojtek Mruczkiewicz
    Xiao Mi
    Yu Chen
    arXiv preprint arXiv:2012.00921 (2020)
    Preview abstract A promising approach to study quantum materials is to simulate them on an engineered quantum platform. However, achieving the accuracy needed to outperform classical methods has been an outstanding challenge. Here, using superconducting qubits, we provide an experimental blueprint for a programmable and accurate quantum matter simulator and demonstrate how to probe fundamental electronic properties. We illustrate the underlying method by reconstructing the single-particle band-structure of a one-dimensional wire. We demonstrate nearly complete mitigation of decoherence and readout errors and arrive at an accuracy in measuring energy eigenvalues of this wire with an error of ~0.01 radians, whereas typical energy scales are of order 1 radian. Insight into this unprecedented algorithm fidelity is gained by highlighting robust properties of a Fourier transform, including the ability to resolve eigenenergies with a statistical uncertainty of 1e-4 radians. Furthermore, we synthesize magnetic flux and disordered local potentials, two key tenets of a condensed-matter system. When sweeping the magnetic flux, we observe avoided level crossings in the spectrum, a detailed fingerprint of the spatial distribution of local disorder. Combining these methods, we reconstruct electronic properties of the eigenstates where we observe persistent currents and a strong suppression of conductance with added disorder. Our work describes an accurate method for quantum simulation and paves the way to study novel quantum materials with superconducting qubits. View details
    Preview abstract This paper is a tutorial on quantum computing designed for hardware engineers. We begin by explaining the type of computation that is carried out on a universal quantum computer then describe the requirement for hardware used to build a such system. We then explain how each of these requirements can be met using superconducting qubit technology. Connections are made throughout to familiar microwave concepts. The paper ends with a discussion of what is required of a fault-tolerant quantum computer and how the expertise of the microwave engineering community will be required to engineer such a system. View details
    Analog/Mixed-Signal Integrated Circuits for Quantum Computing
    Proceedings of the 2020 IEEE BiCMOS and Compound Semiconductor Integrated Circuits and Technology Symposium (BCICTS)
    Preview abstract Future error-corrected quantum computers will require analog/mixed-signal control systems capable of providing a million or more high-precision analog waveforms. In this article, we begin by introducing the reader to superconducting transmon qubit technology and then explain how the state of a quantum processor implemented in this technology is controlled. By example, we then show how one can implement one part of the quantum control system as a cryogenic integrated circuit and review experimental results from the characterization of such an IC. The article concludes with a discussion of analog/mixed-signal design challenges that must be overcome in order to build the system required to control a million-qubit quantum computer. View details
    Hartree-Fock on a Superconducting Qubit Quantum Computer
    Frank Carlton Arute
    Kunal Arya
    Rami Barends
    Michael Blythe Broughton
    Bob Benjamin Buckley
    Nicholas Bushnell
    Yu Chen
    Jimmy Chen
    Benjamin Chiaro
    Roberto Collins
    William Courtney
    Andrew Dunsworth
    Edward Farhi
    Brooks Riley Foxen
    Rob Graff
    Steve Habegger
    Alan Ho
    Trent Huang
    William J. Huggins
    Sergei Isakov
    Cody Jones
    Kostyantyn Kechedzhi
    Alexander Korotkov
    Fedor Kostritsa
    Dave Landhuis
    Pavel Laptev
    Mike Lindmark
    Orion Martin
    John Martinis
    Anthony Megrant
    Xiao Mi
    Masoud Mohseni
    Wojtek Mruczkiewicz
    Josh Mutus
    Charles Neill
    Thomas E O'Brien
    Eric Ostby
    Andre Gregory Petukhov
    Harry Putterman
    Vadim Smelyanskiy
    Doug Strain
    Kevin Jeffery Sung
    Marco Szalay
    Tyler Y. Takeshita
    Amit Vainsencher
    Nathan Wiebe
    Jamie Yao
    Ping Yeh
    Science, vol. 369 (2020), pp. 6507
    Preview abstract As the search continues for useful applications of noisy intermediate scale quantum devices, variational simulations of fermionic systems remain one of the most promising directions. Here, we perform a series of quantum simulations of chemistry which involve twice the number of qubits and more than ten times the number of gates as the largest prior experiments. We model the binding energy of ${\rm H}_6$, ${\rm H}_8$, ${\rm H}_{10}$ and ${\rm H}_{12}$ chains as well as the isomerization of diazene. We also demonstrate error-mitigation strategies based on $N$-representability which dramatically improve the effective fidelity of our experiments. Our parameterized ansatz circuits realize the Givens rotation approach to free fermion evolution, which we variationally optimize to prepare the Hartree-Fock wavefunction. This ubiquitous algorithmic primitive corresponds to a rotation of the orbital basis and is required by many proposals for correlated simulations of molecules and Hubbard models. Because free fermion evolutions are classically tractable to simulate, yet still generate highly entangled states over the computational basis, we use these experiments to benchmark the performance of our hardware while establishing a foundation for scaling up more complex correlated quantum simulations of chemistry. View details
    A 28nm Bulk-CMOS 4-to-8GHz <2mW Cryogenic Pulse Modulator for Scalable Quantum Computing
    Trent Huang
    Rami Barends
    Kunal Arya
    Ben Chiaro
    Jimmy Chen
    Yu Chen
    Andrew Dunsworth
    Brooks Foxen
    Rob Graff
    Josh Mutus
    Anthony Megrant
    Charles Neill
    Amit Vainsencher
    John Martinis
    Proceedings of the 2019 International Solid State Circuits Conference, IEEE, pp. 456-458
    Preview abstract Future quantum computing systems will require cryogenic integrated circuits to control and measure millions of qubits. In this paper, we report design and measurement of a prototype cryogenic CMOS integrated circuit that has been optimized for the control of transmon qubits. The circuit has been integrated into a quantum measurement setup and its performance has been validated through multiple quantum control experiments. View details
    Preview abstract Implementation of an error corrected quantum computer is believed to require a quantum processor with on the order of a million or more physical qubits and, in order to run such a processor, a quantum control system of similar scale will be required. Such a controller will need to be integrated within the cryogenic system and in close proximity with the quantum processor in order to make such a system practical. Here, we present a prototype cryogenic CMOS quantum controller designed in a 28-nm bulk CMOS process and optimized to implement a 4-bit XY gate instruction set for transmon qubits. After introducing the transmon qubit, including a discussion of how it is controlled, design considerations are discussed, with an emphasis on error rates and scalability. The circuit design is then discussed. Cryogenic performance of the underlying technology is presented and the results of several quantum control experiments carried out using the integrated controller are described. The paper ends with a comparison to the state of the art. It has been shown that the quantum control IC achieves comparable performance with a conventional rack mount control system while dissipating less than 2mW of total AC and DC power and requiring a digital data stream of less than 500 Mb/s. View details
    Quantum Supremacy using a Programmable Superconducting Processor
    Frank Arute
    Kunal Arya
    Rami Barends
    Rupak Biswas
    Fernando Brandao
    David Buell
    Yu Chen
    Jimmy Chen
    Ben Chiaro
    Roberto Collins
    William Courtney
    Andrew Dunsworth
    Edward Farhi
    Brooks Foxen
    Austin Fowler
    Rob Graff
    Keith Guerin
    Steve Habegger
    Michael Hartmann
    Alan Ho
    Trent Huang
    Travis Humble
    Sergei Isakov
    Kostyantyn Kechedzhi
    Sergey Knysh
    Alexander Korotkov
    Fedor Kostritsa
    Dave Landhuis
    Mike Lindmark
    Dmitry Lyakh
    Salvatore Mandrà
    Anthony Megrant
    Xiao Mi
    Kristel Michielsen
    Masoud Mohseni
    Josh Mutus
    Charles Neill
    Eric Ostby
    Andre Petukhov
    Eleanor G. Rieffel
    Vadim Smelyanskiy
    Kevin Jeffery Sung
    Matt Trevithick
    Amit Vainsencher
    Benjamin Villalonga
    Z. Jamie Yao
    Ping Yeh
    John Martinis
    Nature, vol. 574 (2019), 505–510
    Preview abstract The promise of quantum computers is that certain computational tasks might be executed exponentially faster on a quantum processor than on a classical processor. A fundamental challenge is to build a high-fidelity processor capable of running quantum algorithms in an exponentially large computational space. Here we report the use of a processor with programmable superconducting qubits to create quantum states on 53 qubits, corresponding to a computational state-space of dimension 2^53 (about 10^16). Measurements from repeated experiments sample the resulting probability distribution, which we verify using classical simulations. Our Sycamore processor takes about 200 seconds to sample one instance of a quantum circuit a million times-our benchmarks currently indicate that the equivalent task for a state-of-the-art classical supercomputer would take approximately 10,000 years. This dramatic increase in speed compared to all known classical algorithms is an experimental realization of quantum supremacy for this specific computational task, heralding a much-anticipated computing paradigm. View details
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