Jump to Content

Shruthi Prabhakara

Shruthi Prabhakara leads a team in Google Health whose mission is to research and develop state-of-the-art medical imaging products backed by Google's ML R&D technology. Prior to this, she has led teams in research (Perception, Augmented Reality) and personalized advertising. Her PhD. work at Pennsylvania State University's CSE department focused on problems at the intersection of machine learning and bioinformatics.
Authored Publications
Google Publications
Other Publications
Sort By
  • Title
  • Title, descending
  • Year
  • Year, descending
    Preview abstract Advances in machine learning for health care have brought concerns about bias from the research community; specifically, the introduction, perpetuation, or exacerbation of care disparities. Reinforcing these concerns is the finding that medical images often reveal signals about sensitive attributes in ways that are hard to pinpoint by both algorithms and people. This finding raises a question about how to best design general purpose pretrained embeddings (GPPEs, defined as embeddings meant to support a broad array of use cases) for building downstream models that are free from particular types of bias. The downstream model should be carefully evaluated for bias, and audited and improved as appropriate. However, in our view, well intentioned attempts to prevent the upstream components—GPPEs—from learning sensitive attributes can have unintended consequences on the downstream models. Despite producing a veneer of technical neutrality, the resultant end-to-end system might still be biased or poorly performing. We present reasons, by building on previously published data, to support the reasoning that GPPEs should ideally contain as much information as the original data contain, and highlight the perils of trying to remove sensitive attributes from a GPPE. We also emphasise that downstream prediction models trained for specific tasks and settings, whether developed using GPPEs or not, should be carefully designed and evaluated to avoid bias that makes models vulnerable to issues such as distributional shift. These evaluations should be done by a diverse team, including social scientists, on a diverse cohort representing the full breadth of the patient population for which the final model is intended. View details
    Assistive AI in Lung Cancer Screening: A Retrospective Multinational Study in the United States and Japan
    Atilla Kiraly
    Corbin Cunningham
    Ryan Najafi
    Jie Yang
    Chuck Lau
    Diego Ardila
    Scott Mayer McKinney
    Rory Pilgrim
    Mozziyar Etemadi
    Sunny Jansen
    Lily Peng
    Shravya Shetty
    Neeral Beladia
    Radiology: Artificial Intelligence (2024)
    Preview abstract Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death world-wide with 1.8 million deaths in 20201. Studies have concluded that low-dose computed tomography lung cancer screening can reduce mortality by up to 61%2 and updated 2021 US guidelines expanded eligibility. As screening efforts rise, AI can play an important role, but must be unobtrusively integrated into existing clinical workflows. In this work, we introduce a state-of-the-art, cloud-based AI system providing lung cancer risk assessments without requiring any user input. We demonstrate its efficacy in assisting lung cancer screening under both US and Japanese screening settings using different patient populations and screening protocols. Technical improvements over a previously described system include a focus on earlier cancer detection for improved accuracy, introduction of an effective assistive user interface, and a system designed to integrate into typical clinical workflows. The stand-alone AI system was evaluated on 3085 individuals achieving area under the curve (AUC) scores of 91.7% (95%CI [89.6, 95.2]), 93.3% (95%CI [90.2, 95.7]), and 89.1% (95%CI [77.7, 97.3]) on three datasets (two from US and one from Japan), respectively. To evaluate the system’s assistive ability, we conducted two retrospective multi-reader multi-case studies on 627 cases read by experienced board certified radiologists (average 20 years of experience [7,40]) using local PACS systems in the respective US and Japanese screening settings. The studies measured the reader’s level of suspicion (LoS) and categorical responses for scores and management recommendations under country-specific screening protocols. The radiologists’ AUC for LoS increased with AI assistance by 2.3% (95%CI [0.1-4.5], p=0.022) for the US study and by 2.3% (95%CI [-3.5-8.1], p=0.179) for the Japan study. Specificity for recalls increased by 5.5% (95%CI [2.7-8.5], p<0.0001) for the US and 6.7% (95%CI [4.7-8.7], p<0.0001) for the Japan study. No significant reduction in other metrics occured. This work advances the state-of-the-art in lung cancer detection, introduces generalizable interface concepts that can be applicable to similar AI applications, and demonstrates its potential impact on diagnostic AI in global lung cancer screening with results suggesting a substantial drop in unnecessary follow-up procedures without impacting sensitivity. View details
    Preview abstract Health-related acoustic signals, such as cough and breathing sounds, are relevant for medical diagnosis and continuous health monitoring. Most existing machine learning approaches for health acoustics are trained and evaluated on specific tasks, limiting their generalizability across various healthcare applications. In this paper, we leverage a self-supervised learning framework, SimCLR with a Slowfast NFNet backbone, for contrastive learning of health acoustics. A crucial aspect of optimizing Slowfast NFNets for this application lies in identifying effective audio augmentations. We conduct an in-depth analysis of various audio augmentation strategies and demonstrate that an appropriate augmentation strategy enhances the performance of the Slowfast NFNet audio encoder across a diverse set of health acoustic tasks. Our findings reveal that when augmentations are combined, they can produce synergistic effects that exceed the benefits seen when each is applied individually. View details
    ELIXR: Towards a general purpose X-ray artificial intelligence system through alignment of large language models and radiology vision encoders
    Shawn Xu
    Lin Yang
    Timo Kohlberger
    Martin Ma
    Atilla Kiraly
    Sahar Kazemzadeh
    Zakkai Melamed
    Jungyeon Park
    Patricia MacWilliams
    Chuck Lau
    Christina Chen
    Mozziyar Etemadi
    Sreenivasa Raju Kalidindi
    Kat Chou
    Shravya Shetty
    Daniel Golden
    Rory Pilgrim
    arxiv (2023)
    Preview abstract Our approach, which we call Embeddings for Language/Image-aligned X-Rays, or ELIXR, leverages a language-aligned image encoder combined or grafted onto a fixed LLM, PaLM 2, to perform a broad range of tasks. We train this lightweight adapter architecture using images paired with corresponding free-text radiology reports from the MIMIC-CXR dataset. ELIXR achieved state-of-the-art performance on zero-shot chest X-ray (CXR) classification (mean AUC of 0.850 across 13 findings), data-efficient CXR classification (mean AUCs of 0.893 and 0.898 across five findings (atelectasis, cardiomegaly, consolidation, pleural effusion, and pulmonary edema) for 1% (~2,200 images) and 10% (~22,000 images) training data), and semantic search (0.76 normalized discounted cumulative gain (NDCG) across nineteen queries, including perfect retrieval on twelve of them). Compared to existing data-efficient methods including supervised contrastive learning (SupCon), ELIXR required two orders of magnitude less data to reach similar performance. ELIXR also showed promise on CXR vision-language tasks, demonstrating overall accuracies of 58.7% and 62.5% on visual question answering and report quality assurance tasks, respectively. These results suggest that ELIXR is a robust and versatile approach to CXR AI. View details
    Deep Learning Detection of Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis at Chest Radiography Matched the Clinical Performance of Radiologists
    Sahar Kazemzadeh
    Jin Yu
    Shahar Jamshy
    Rory Pilgrim
    Christina Chen
    Neeral Beladia
    Chuck Lau
    Scott Mayer McKinney
    Thad Hughes
    Atilla Peter Kiraly
    Sreenivasa Raju Kalidindi
    Monde Muyoyeta
    Jameson Malemela
    Ting Shih
    Lily Hao Yi Peng
    Kat Chou
    Cameron Chen
    Shravya Ramesh Shetty
    Radiology (2022)
    Preview abstract Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends chest radiography to facilitate tuberculosis (TB) screening. However, chest radiograph interpretation expertise remains limited in many regions. Purpose: To develop a deep learning system (DLS) to detect active pulmonary TB on chest radiographs and compare its performance to that of radiologists. Materials and Methods: A DLS was trained and tested using retrospective chest radiographs (acquired between 1996 and 2020) from 10 countries. To improve generalization, large-scale chest radiograph pretraining, attention pooling, and semisupervised learning (“noisy-student”) were incorporated. The DLS was evaluated in a four-country test set (China, India, the United States, and Zambia) and in a mining population in South Africa, with positive TB confirmed with microbiological tests or nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT). The performance of the DLS was compared with that of 14 radiologists. The authors studied the efficacy of the DLS compared with that of nine radiologists using the Obuchowski-Rockette-Hillis procedure. Given WHO targets of 90% sensitivity and 70% specificity, the operating point of the DLS (0.45) was prespecified to favor sensitivity. Results: A total of 165 754 images in 22 284 subjects (mean age, 45 years; 21% female) were used for model development and testing. In the four-country test set (1236 subjects, 17% with active TB), the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of the DLS was higher than those for all nine India-based radiologists, with an area under the ROC curve of 0.89 (95% CI: 0.87, 0.91). Compared with these radiologists, at the prespecified operating point, the DLS sensitivity was higher (88% vs 75%, P < .001) and specificity was noninferior (79% vs 84%, P = .004). Trends were similar within other patient subgroups, in the South Africa data set, and across various TB-specific chest radiograph findings. In simulations, the use of the DLS to identify likely TB-positive chest radiographs for NAAT confirmation reduced the cost by 40%–80% per TB-positive patient detected. Conclusion: A deep learning method was found to be noninferior to radiologists for the determination of active tuberculosis on digital chest radiographs. View details
    Supervised Transfer Learning at Scale for Medical Imaging
    Aaron Loh
    Basil Mustafa
    Jan Freyberg
    Patricia MacWilliams
    Megan Wilson
    Scott Mayer McKinney
    Peggy Bui
    Umesh Telang
    ArXiV (2021)
    Preview abstract Transfer learning is a standard building block of successful medical imaging models, yet previous efforts suggest that at limited scale of pre-training data and model capacity, benefits of transfer learning to medical imaging are insubstantial. In this work, we explore whether scaling up pre-training can help improve transfer to medical tasks. In particular, we show that when using the Big Transfer recipe to further scale up pre-training, we can indeed considerably improve transfer performance across three popular yet diverse medical imaging tasks - interpretation of chest radiographs, breast cancer detection from mammograms and skin condition detection from smartphone images. Despite pre-training on unrelated source domains, we show that scaling up the model capacity and pre-training data yields performance improvements regardless of how much downstream medical data is available. In particular, we show suprisingly large improvements to zero-shot generalisation under distribution shift. Probing and quantifying other aspects of model performance relevant to medical imaging and healthcare, we demonstrate that these gains do not come at the expense of model calibration or fairness. View details
    No Results Found