Rebecca Moore

Rebecca Moore

Rebecca Moore is a computer scientist and longtime software professional. At Google, she conceived and leads the Google Earth Outreach program, which supports nonprofits, communities and indigenous peoples around the world in applying Google's mapping tools to the world's pressing problems in areas such as environmental conservation, human rights and creating a sustainable society. Her personal work using Google Earth was instrumental in stopping the logging of more than a thousand acres of redwoods in her Santa Cruz Mountain community.
Rebecca also initiated and leads the development of Google Earth Engine, a new technology platform which supports global-scale data-mining of satellite imagery for societal benefit. Rebecca received a bachelor's degree with honors from Brown University in Artificial Intelligence, a master's degree from Stanford University, and is currently on leave from the Stanford Ph.D. program in Computer Science.
Authored Publications
Google Publications
Other Publications
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    Google Earth Engine: Planetary-Scale Geospatial Analysis for Everyone
    Matt Hancher
    Mike Dixon
    Simon Ilyushchenko
    David Thau
    Remote Sensing of Environment, 202(2017), pp. 18-27
    Preview abstract Google Earth Engine is a cloud-based platform for planetary-scale geospatial analysis that brings Google's massive computational capabilities to bear on a variety of high-impact societal issues including deforestation, drought, disaster, disease, food security, water management, climate monitoring and environmental protection. It is unique in the field as an integrated platform designed to empower not only traditional remote sensing scientists, but also a much wider audience that lacks the technical capacity needed to utilize traditional supercomputers or large-scale commodity cloud computing resources. View details
    High-Resolution Global Maps of 21st-Century Forest Cover Change
    Matt Hancher
    David Thau
    Science, 342(2013), pp. 850-853
    Preview abstract Quantification of global forest change has been lacking despite the recognized importance of forest ecosystem services. In this study, Earth observation satellite data were used to map global forest loss (2.3 million square kilometers) and gain (0.8 million square kilometers) from 2000 to 2012 at a spatial resolution of 30 meters. The tropics were the only climate domain to exhibit a trend, with forest loss increasing by 2101 square kilometers per year. Brazil’s well-documented reduction in deforestation was offset by increasing forest loss in Indonesia, Malaysia, Paraguay, Bolivia, Zambia, Angola, and elsewhere. Intensive forestry practiced within subtropical forests resulted in the highest rates of forest change globally. Boreal forest loss due largely to fire and forestry was second to that in the tropics in absolute and proportional terms. These results depict a globally consistent and locally relevant record of forest change. View details
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