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Thang Luong

Thang Luong

Thang Luong is currently a Senior Staff Research Scientist at Google DeepMind, ex Google Brain. He obtained his PhD in Computer Science from Stanford University in 2016, during which he pioneered the field of deep learning for machine translation. At Google DeepMind, Dr. Luong built state-of-the-art models in both language (QANet, ELECTRA) and vision (UDA, NoisyStudent). He is a co-founder the Meena project, which debuted the world’s best chatbot in 2020 (later became Google LaMDA, Bard, now Gemini) and an inventor of LuongAttention. Dr. Luong has been co-leading the development of Bard Multimodality since 2022 and is the lead of the AlphaGeometry project that solves Olympiad geometry problems at the IMO level (Nature, 2024).

Academically, Dr. Luong has served as area chairs at ACL & NeuRIPS conferences. He has published over 50 articles at top-tiered conferences, with over 30000 citations and 20 patents. All of his publications can be found at Google Scholar. Blogposts: AlphaGeometry, self-training & Google search, conversational chatbot, semi-supervised learning, language pretraining, and neural machine translation.
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    Solving olympiad geometry without human demonstrations
    Trieu Trinh
    Yuhuai Tony Wu
    He He
    Nature, vol. 625 (2024), pp. 476-482
    Preview abstract Proving mathematical theorems at the olympiad level represents a notable milestone in human-level automated reasoning, owing to their reputed difficulty among the world’s best talents in pre-university mathematics. Current machine-learning approaches, however, are not applicable to most mathematical domains owing to the high cost of translating human proofs into machine-verifiable format. The problem is even worse for geometry because of its unique translation challenges, resulting in severe scarcity of training data. We propose AlphaGeometry, a theorem prover for Euclidean plane geometry that sidesteps the need for human demonstrations by synthesizing millions of theorems and proofs across different levels of complexity. AlphaGeometry is a neuro-symbolic system that uses a neural language model, trained from scratch on our large-scale synthetic data, to guide a symbolic deduction engine through infinite branching points in challenging problems. On a test set of 30 latest olympiad-level problems, AlphaGeometry solves 25, outperforming the previous best method that only solves ten problems and approaching the performance of an average International Mathematical Olympiad (IMO) gold medallist. Notably, AlphaGeometry produces human-readable proofs, solves all geometry problems in the IMO 2000 and 2015 under human expert evaluation and discovers a generalized version of a translated IMO theorem in 2004. View details
    Meta Pseudo Labels
    Hieu Pham
    Zihang Dai
    Qizhe Xie
    IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (2021)
    Preview abstract We present Meta Pseudo Labels, a semi-supervised learning method that achieves a new state-of-the-art top-1 accuracy of 90.2% on ImageNet, which is 1.6% better than the existing state-of-the-art. Like Pseudo Labels, Meta Pseudo Labels has a teacher networ View details
    Beyond Distillation: Task-level Mixture-of-Experts for Efficient Inference
    Dmitry (Dima) Lepikhin
    Maxim Krikun
    Beyond Distillation: Task-level Mixture-of-Experts for Efficient Inference (2021)
    Preview abstract Sparse Mixture-of-Experts (MoE) has been a successful approach for scaling multilingual translation models to billions of parameters without a proportional increase in training computation. However, MoE models are prohibitively large and practitioners often resort to methods such as distillation for serving. In this work, we investigate routing strategies at different granularity (token, sentence, task) in MoE models to bypass distillation. Experiments on WMT and a web-scale dataset suggest that task-level routing (task-MoE) enables us to extract smaller, ready-to-deploy sub-networks from large sparse models. On WMT, our task-MoE with 32 experts (533M parameters) outperforms the best performing token-level MoE model (token-MoE) by +1.0 BLEU on average across 30 language pairs. The peak inference throughput is also improved by a factor of 1.9x when we route by tasks instead of tokens. While distilling a token-MoE to a smaller dense model preserves only 32% of the BLEU gains, our sub-network task-MoE, by design, preserves all the gains with the same inference cost as the distilled student model. Finally, when scaling up to 200 language pairs, our 128-expert task-MoE (13B parameters) performs competitively with a token-level counterpart, while improving the peak inference throughput by a factor of 2.6x. View details
    Preview abstract Despite recent success, most contrastive self-supervised learning methods are domain-specific, relying heavily on data augmentation techniques that require knowledge about a particular domain, such as image cropping and rotation. To overcome such limitation, we propose a novel domain-agnostic approach to contrastive learning, named DACL, that is applicable to domains where invariances, and thus, data augmentation techniques, are not readily available. Key to our approach is the use of Mixup noise to create similar and dissimilar examples by mixing data samples differently either at the input or hidden-state levels.To demonstrate the effectiveness of DACL, we conduct experiments across various domains such as tabular data, images, and graphs. Our results show that DACL not only outperforms other domain-agnostic noising methods, such as Gaussian-noise, but also combines well with domain-specific methods, such as SimCLR, to improve self-supervised visual representation learning. Finally, we theoretically analyze our method and show advantages over the Gaussian-noise based contrastive learning approach. View details
    STraTA: Self-Training with Task Augmentation for Better Few-shot Learning
    Mohit Iyyer
    Proceedings of the 2021 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP), Association for Computational Linguistics
    Preview abstract Despite their recent successes in tackling many NLP tasks, large-scale pre-trained language models do not perform as well in few-shot settings where only a handful of training examples are available. To address this shortcoming, we propose STraTA, which stands for Self-Training with Task Augmentation, an approach that builds on two key ideas for effective leverage of unlabeled data. First, STraTA uses task augmentation, a novel technique that synthesizes a large amount of data for auxiliary-task fine-tuning from target-task unlabeled texts. Second, STraTA performs self-training by further fine-tuning the strong base model created by task augmentation on a broad distribution of pseudo-labeled data. Our experiments demonstrate that STraTA can substantially improve sample efficiency across 12 few-shot benchmarks. Remarkably, on the SST-2 sentiment dataset, STraTA, with only 8 training examples per class, achieves comparable results to standard fine-tuning with 67K training examples. Our analyses reveal that task augmentation and self-training are both complementary and independently effective. View details
    Towards a Human-like Open-Domain Chatbot
    Apoorv Kulshreshtha
    Daniel De Freitas Adiwardana
    David Richard So
    Gaurav Nemade
    Jamie Hall
    Romal Thoppilan
    Yifeng Lu
    Zi Yang
    arXiv (2020)
    Preview abstract We present Meena, a multi-turn end-to-end open-domain chatbot trained on data mined from public social media and filtered. The model was trained to minimize perplexity of the next token, but we have found evidence that this metric correlates with human judgement of quality. We propose a human judgement metric called Sensibleness and Specificity Average (SSA) which captures key elements of good conversation. Extensive experiments show strong correlation between perplexity and SSA. The fact that Meena scores high on SSA, 72%, on multi-turn evaluation suggests that a human-like chatbot with SSA score of 82% is potentially within reach if we manage to optimize perplexity better. View details
    Preview abstract Masked language modeling (MLM) pre-training methods such as BERT corrupt the input by replacing some tokens with [MASK] and then train a model to reconstruct the original tokens. While they produce good results when transferred to downstream NLP tasks, they generally require large amounts of compute to be effective. As an alternative, we propose a more sample-efficient pre-training task called replaced token detection. Instead of masking the input, our approach corrupts it by replacing some tokens with plausible alternatives sampled from a small generator network. Then, instead of training a model that predicts the original identities of the corrupted tokens, we train a discriminative model that predicts whether each token in the corrupted input was replaced by a generator sample or not. Thorough experiments demonstrate this new pre-training task is more efficient than MLM because the task is defined over all input tokens rather than just the small subset that was masked out. As a result, the contextual representations learned by our approach substantially outperform the ones learned by BERT given the same model size, data, and compute. The gains are particularly strong for small models; for example, we train a model on one GPU for 4 days that outperforms GPT (trained using 30x more compute) on the GLUE natural language understanding benchmark. Our approach also works well at scale, where it performs comparably to RoBERTa and XLNet while using less than 1/4 of their compute and outperforms them when using the same amount of compute. View details
    Preview abstract We introduce Electric, an energy-based cloze model for representation learning over text. Like BERT, it is a conditional generative model of tokens given their contexts. However, Electric does not use masking or output a full distribution over tokens that could occur in a context. Instead, it assigns a scalar energy score to each input token indicating how likely it is given its context. We train Electric using an algorithm based on noise-contrastive estimation and elucidate how this learning objective is closely related to the recently proposed ELECTRA pre-training method. Electric performs well when transferred to downstream tasks and is particularly effective at producing likelihood scores for text: it reranks speech recognition n-best lists better than language models and much faster than masked language models. Furthermore, it offers a clearer and more principled view of what ELECTRA learns during pre-training. View details
    Preview abstract Semi-supervised learning lately has shown much promise in improving deep learning models when labeled data is scarce. Common among recent approaches is the use of consistency training on a large amount of unlabeled data to constrain model predictions to be invariant to input noise. In this work, we present a new perspective on how to effectively noise unlabeled examples and argue that the quality of noising, specifically those produced by advanced data augmentation methods, plays a crucial role in semi-supervised learning. By substituting simple noising operations with advanced data augmentation methods such as RandAugment and back-translation, our method brings substantial improvements across six language and three vision tasks under the same consistency training framework. On the IMDb text classification dataset, with only 20 labeled examples, our method achieves an error rate of 4.20, outperforming the state-of-the-art model trained on 25,000 labeled examples. On a standard semi-supervised learning benchmark, CIFAR-10, our method outperforms all previous approaches and achieves an error rate of 5.43 with only 250 examples. Our method also combines well with transfer learning, e.g., when finetuning from BERT, and yields improvements in high-data regime, such as ImageNet, whether when there is only 10% labeled data or when a full labeled set with 1.3M extra unlabeled examples is used. Code is available at https://github.com/google-research/uda. View details
    Just Pick a Sign: Reducing Gradient Conflict in Deep Networks with Gradient Sign Dropout
    Drago Anguelov
    Henrik Kretzschmar
    Jiquan Ngiam
    Yuning Chai
    Zhao Chen
    NeurIPS 2020 Submission (2020) (to appear)
    Preview abstract The vast majority of modern deep neural networks produce multiple gradient signals which then attempt to update the same set of scalar weights. Such updates are often incompatible with each other, leading to gradient conflicts which impede optimal network training. We present Gradient Sign Dropout (GradDrop), a probabilistic masking procedure which encourages backpropagation only of gradients which are mutually consistent at a given deep activation layer. GradDrop is simple to implement as a modular layer within any deepnet and is synergistic with other gradient balancing approaches. We show that GradDrop performs better than other state-of-the-art methods for two very common contexts in which gradient conflicts pose a problem: multitask learning and transfer learning. View details
    Preview abstract We present a simple self-training method that achieves 88.4% top-1 accuracy on ImageNet, which is 2.0% better than the state-of-the-art model that requires 3.5B weakly labeled Instagram images. On robustness test sets, it improves ImageNet-A top-1 accuracy from 61.0% to 83.7%, reduces ImageNet-C mean corruption error from 45.7 to 28.3, and reduces ImageNet-P mean flip rate from 27.8 to 12.2. To achieve this result, we first train an EfficientNet model on labeled ImageNet images and use it as a teacher to generate pseudo labels on 300M unlabeled images. We then train a larger EfficientNet as a student model on the combination of labeled and pseudo labeled images. We iterate this process by putting back the student as the teacher. During the generation of the pseudo labels, the teacher is not noised so that the pseudo labels are as accurate as possible. However, during the learning of the student, we inject noise such as dropout, stochastic depth and data augmentation via RandAugment to the student so that the student generalizes better than the teacher. View details
    Mixtape: Breaking the Softmax Bottleneck Efficiently
    Zhilin Yang
    Ruslan Salakhutdinov
    Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems (2019)
    Preview abstract The softmax bottleneck has been shown to limit the expressiveness of neural language models. Mixture of Softmaxes (MoS) is an effective approach to address such a theoretical limitation, but are expensive compared to softmax in terms of both memory and time. We propose Mixtape, an output layer that breaks the softmax bottleneck more efficiently with three novel techniques—logit space vector gating, sigmoid tree decomposition, and gate sharing. On four benchmarks including language modeling and machine translation, the Mixtape layer substantially improves the efficiency over the MoS layer by 3.5x to 10.5x while obtaining similar performance. A network equipped with Mixtape is only 20% to 34% slower than a softmax-based network with 10-30K vocabulary sizes, and outperforms softmax in perplexity and translation quality. View details
    Preview abstract It can be challenging to train multi-task neural networks that outperform or even match their single-task counterparts. To help address this, we propose using knowledge distillation where single-task models teach a multi-task model. We enhance this training with teacher annealing, a novel method that gradually transitions the model from distillation to supervised learning, helping the multi-task model surpass its single-task teachers. We evaluate our approach by multi-task fine-tuning BERT on the GLUE benchmark. Our method consistently improves over standard single-task and multi-task training. View details
    Preview abstract Despite recent advances in training recurrent neural networks (RNNs), capturing long-term dependencies in sequences remains a fundamental challenge. Most approaches use backpropagation through time (BPTT), which is difficult to scale to very long sequences. This paper proposes a simple method that improves the ability to capture long term dependencies in RNNs by adding an unsupervised auxiliary loss to the original objective. This auxiliary loss forces RNNs to either reconstruct previous events or predict next events in a sequence, making truncated backpropagation feasible for long sequences and also improving full BPTT. We evaluate our method on a variety of settings, including pixel-by-pixel image classification with sequence lengths up to 16\,000, and a real document classification benchmark. Our results highlight good performance and resource efficiency of this approach over competitive baselines, including other recurrent models and a comparable sized Transformer. Further analyses reveal beneficial effects of the auxiliary loss on optimization and regularization, as well as extreme cases where there is little to no backpropagation. View details
    Preview abstract We present a simple but effective technique for deep semi-supervised learning. On labeled examples, the model is trained with standard cross-entropy loss. On an unlabeled example, the model first performs inference (acting as a “teacher”) and then learns from the resulting output distribution (acting as a “student”). We deviate from prior work by adding multiple auxiliary student softmax layers to the model. The input to each student layer is a sub-network of the full model that has a restricted view of the input (e.g., only seeing one region of an image). The students can learn from the teacher because the teacher sees more of each example. Concurrently, the students improve the representations used by the teacher as they learn to make predictions with limited data. We propose variants of our method for CNN image classifiers and BiLSTM sequence taggers. When combined with Virtual Adversarial Training, it improves upon the current state-of-the-art on semi-supervised CIFAR-10 and semi-supervised SVHN. We also apply it to train semi-supervised sequence taggers for four Natural Language Processing tasks using hundreds of millions of sentences of unlabeled data. The resulting models improve upon or are competitive with the current state-of-the-art on every task. View details
    Preview abstract Current end-to-end Q&A models are primarily based on recurrent neural networks with attention. Despite their success, these models are often slow for both training and inference. We propose a novel Q&A model that does not require recurrent networks yet achieves equivalent or better performance than existing models. Our model is simple in that it consists exclusively of attention and convolutions. We present a thorough study of architectural choices that improve the accuracy of this simple model. We also propose a novel data augmentation technique that not only enhances the training examples but also diversifies the phrasing of the sentences. It results in immediate improvement in the accuracy. This technique is of independent interest that it can be readily applied to other natural language processing tasks. On the SQuAD dataset, our model is 3x faster in training and 10x faster in inference. The model achieves 82.2 F1 score on the development set, which is on par with best documented result of 81.8. View details
    Preview abstract Recurrent neural network models with an attention mechanism have proven to be extremely effective on a wide variety of sequence-to-sequence problems. However, the fact that soft attention mechanisms perform a pass over the entire input sequence when producing each element in the output sequence precludes their use in online settings and results in a quadratic time complexity. Based on the insight that the alignment between input and output sequence elements is monotonic in many problems of interest, we propose an end-to-end differentiable method for learning monotonic alignments which, at test time, enables computing attention online and in linear time. We validate our approach on sentence summarization, machine translation, and online speech recognition problems and achieve results competitive with existing sequence-to-sequence models. View details
    Preview abstract Neural Machine Translation (NMT) has shown remarkable progress over the past few years with production systems now being deployed to end-users. One major drawback of current architectures is that they are expensive to train, typically requiring days to weeks of GPU time to converge. This makes exhaustive hyperparameter search, as is commonly done with other neural network architectures, prohibitively expensive. In this work, we present the first large-scale analysis of NMT architecture hyperparameters. We report empirical results and variance numbers for several hundred experimental runs, corresponding to over 250,000 GPU hours on the standard WMT English to German translation task. Our experiments lead to novel insights and practical advice for building and extending NMT architectures. As part of this contribution, we release an open-source NMT framework that enables researchers to easily experiment with novel techniques and reproduce state of the art results. View details
    Preview abstract The standard content-based attention mechanism typically used in sequence-to-sequence models is computationally expensive as it requires the comparison of large encoder and decoder states at each time step. In this work, we propose an alternative attention mechanism based on a fixed size memory representation that is more efficient. Our technique predicts a compact set of K attention contexts during encoding and lets the decoder compute an efficient lookup that does not need to consult the memory. We show that our approach performs on-par with the standard attention mechanism while yielding inference speedups of 20% for real-world translation tasks and more for tasks with longer sequences. By visualizing attention scores we demonstrate that our models learn distinct, meaningful alignments. View details
    Multi-task Sequence to Sequence Learning
    Ilya Sutskever
    Lukasz Kaiser
    International Conference on Learning Representations (2016)
    Preview abstract Sequence to sequence learning has recently emerged as a new paradigm in supervised learning. To date, most of its applications focused on only one task and not much work explored this framework for multiple tasks. This paper examines three multi-task learning (MTL) settings for sequence to sequence models: (a) the oneto-many setting - where the encoder is shared between several tasks such as machine translation and syntactic parsing, (b) the many-to-one setting - useful when only the decoder can be shared, as in the case of translation and image caption generation, and (c) the many-to-many setting - where multiple encoders and decoders are shared, which is the case with unsupervised objectives and translation. Our results show that training on a small amount of parsing and image caption data can improve the translation quality between English and German by up to 1.5 BLEU points over strong single-task baselines on the WMT benchmarks. Furthermore, we have established a new state-of-the-art result in constituent parsing with 93.0 F1. Lastly, we reveal interesting properties of the two unsupervised learning objectives, autoencoder and skip-thought, in the MTL context: autoencoder helps less in terms of perplexities but more on BLEU scores compared to skip-thought. View details
    Preview abstract Neural Machine Translation (NMT) is a new approach to machine translation that has shown promising results that are comparable to traditional approaches. A significant weakness in conventional NMT systems is their inability to correctly translate very rare words: end-to-end NMTs tend to have relatively small vocabularies with a single unk symbol that represents every possible out-of-vocabulary (OOV) word. In this paper, we propose and implement an effective technique to address this problem. We train an NMT system on data that is augmented by the output of a word alignment algorithm, allowing the NMT system to emit, for each OOV word in the target sentence, the position of its corresponding word in the source sentence. This information is later utilized in a post-processing step that translates every OOV word using a dictionary. Our experiments on the WMT’14 English to French translation task show that this method provides a substantial improvement of up to 2.8 BLEU points over an equivalent NMT system that does not use this technique. With 37.5 BLEU points, our NMT system is the first to surpass the best result achieved on a WMT’14 contest task. View details
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