Hilary Hutchinson

Hilary Hutchinson

Authored Publications
Google Publications
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    Preview abstract With increased adoption and usage of mobile apps for a variety of purposes, it is important to establish attitudinal measurement designs to measure users’ experiences in context of actual app usage. Such designs should balance mobile UX considerations with survey data quality. To inform choices on contextual mobile survey design, we conduct a comparative evaluation of stars vs smileys as graphical scales for in-context mobile app satisfaction measurement, as follows: To evaluate and compare data quality across scale types, we look at the distributions of the numerical ratings by anchor point stimulus to evaluate the extremity and scale point distances. We also assess criterion validity for stars and smileys, where feasible. To evaluate User Experience across variants, we compare key survey-related signals such as response & dismiss rates, dismiss/response ratio, and time-to-response. View details
    To Smiley, Or Not To Smiley? Considerations and Experimentation to Optimize Data Quality and User Experience for Contextual Product Satisfaction Measurement?
    Aaron Sedley
    Yongwei Yang
    https://docs.google.com/a/google.com/presentation/d/e/2PACX-1vQMmPQ6xeyUWbA_tey23GiXJ8SUdZWn8FiL5E5x7BGrKOLe7Im8UnXOfRxBkFB0OYo_7ioovOpVztB1/pub?start=false&loop=false&delayms=5000(2017)
    Preview abstract Happiness Tracking Surveys (HaTS) at Google are designed to measure satisfaction with a product or feature in context of actual usage. Smiley faces have been added to a fully-labeled satisfaction scale, to increase discoverability of the survey and response rates. Sensitive to the potential variety of effects from images and visual presentation in online surveys (Tourangeau, Conrad & Couper, 2013), this presentation will describe research designed to inform and optimize Google's use of smileys in Happiness Tracking Surveys across products and platforms: 1) We explore construct alignment by capturing users' interpretations of the various smiley faces, via open-ended responses. This data shows meaningful variation across potential smiley images, which informed design decisions. 2) We assess scaling properties of smileys by measuring each smiley independently on a 0-100 scale, to calculate semantic distance between smileys in order to achieve equally-spaced intervals between scale points (Klockars & Yamagishi, 1988). 3) We describe considerations and evaluative metrics for a smiley-based scale with endpoint text labels, to be used with mobile apps and devices. View details
    Adolescent search roles
    Elizabeth Foss
    Allison Druin
    Jason Yip
    Whitney Ford
    Evan Golub
    Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 64(1)(2013), pp. 173-189
    Preview abstract In this article, we present an in-home observation and in-context research study investigating how 38 adolescents aged 14-17 search on the Internet. We present the search trends adolescents display and develop a framework of search roles that these trends help define. We compare these trends and roles to similar trends and roles found in prior work with children ages 7, 9, and 11. We use these comparisons to make recommendations to adult stakeholders such as researchers, designers, and information literacy educators about the best ways to design search tools for children and adolescents, as well as how to use the framework of searching roles to find better methods of educating youth searchers. Major findings include the seven roles of adolescent searchers, and evidence that adolescents are social in their computer use, have a greater knowledge of sources than younger children, and that adolescents are less frustrated by searching tasks than younger children. View details
    Children's Roles Using Keyword Search Interfaces in the Home
    Allison Druin
    Elizabeth Foss
    Evan Golub
    Leshell Hatley
    Proceedings of CHI 2010, ACM Press
    Preview abstract Children want to find information about their world, but there are barriers to finding what they seek. Young people have varying abilities to formulate multi-step queries and comprehend search results. Challenges in understanding where to type, confusion about what tools are available, and frustration with how to parse the results page all have led to a lack of perceived search success for children 7-11 years old. In this paper, we describe seven search roles children display as information seekers using Internet keyword interfaces, based on a home study of 83 children ages 7, 9, and 11. These roles are defined not only by the children’s search actions, but also by who influences their searching, their perceived success, and trends in age and gender. These roles suggest a need for new interfaces that expand the notion of keywords, scaffold results, and develop a search culture among children. View details
    Preview abstract More and more products and services are being deployed on the web, and this presents new challenges and opportunities for measurement of user experience on a large scale. There is a strong need for user-centered metrics for web applications, which can be used to measure progress towards key goals, and drive product decisions. In this note, we describe the HEART framework for user-centered metrics, as well as a process for mapping product goals to metrics. We include practical examples of how HEART metrics have helped product teams make decisions that are both data-driven and user-centered. The framework and process have generalized to enough of our company’s own products that we are confident that teams in other organizations will be able to reuse or adapt them. We also hope to encourage more research into metrics based on large-scale behavioral data. View details
    How Children Search the Internet with Keyword Interfaces
    Allison Druin
    Elizabeth Foss
    Leshell Hatley
    Evan Golub
    Mona Leigh Guha
    Jerry Fails
    Interaction Design and Children, ACM, Como, Italy(2009), pp. 89-96
    Preview
    User Preference and Search Engine Latency
    Jake D. Brutlag
    Maria Stone
    JSM Proceedings, Qualtiy and Productivity Research Section., American Statistical Association, Alexandria, VA(2008)
    Preview abstract Presented at the 2008 Quality and Productivity Research Conference in Madison, WI. View details
    Designing Searching and Browsing Software for Elementary-Age Children
    Allison Druin
    Benjamin Bederson
    Universal Usability: Designing Computer Interfaces for Diverse User Populations, Wiley, West Sussex, UK(2007), pp. 13-42
    Preview
    Shared Family Calendars: Promoting Symmetry and Accessibility
    Catherine Plaisant
    Aaron Clamage
    Benjamin Bederson
    Allison Druin
    ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 13 (3)(2006), pp. 313-346
    Preview
    The Evolution of the International Children's Digital Library Searching and Browsing Interface
    Benjamin Bederson
    Allison Druin
    Proceedings of Interaction Design and Children, ACM Press(2006), pp. 105-112
    Preview
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