Robin Kothari

Robin Kothari

I am a theoretical computer scientist and my primary area of research is quantum algorithms and complexity theory.
Authored Publications
Google Publications
Other Publications
Sort By
  • Title
  • Title, descending
  • Year
  • Year, descending
    Triply efficient shadow tomography
    Robbie King
    David Gosset
    arXiv:2404.19211(2024)
    Preview abstract Given copies of a quantum state $\rho$, a shadow tomography protocol aims to learn all expectation values from a fixed set of observables, to within a given precision $\epsilon$. We say that a shadow tomography protocol is \textit{triply efficient} if it is sample- and time-efficient, and only employs measurements that entangle a constant number of copies of $\rho$ at a time. The classical shadows protocol based on random single-copy measurements is triply efficient for the set of local Pauli observables. This and other protocols based on random single-copy Clifford measurements can be understood as arising from fractional colorings of a graph $G$ that encodes the commutation structure of the set of observables. Here we describe a framework for two-copy shadow tomography that uses an initial round of Bell measurements to reduce to a fractional coloring problem in an induced subgraph of $G$ with bounded clique number. This coloring problem can be addressed using techniques from graph theory known as \textit{chi-boundedness}. Using this framework we give the first triply efficient shadow tomography scheme for the set of local fermionic observables, which arise in a broad class of interacting fermionic systems in physics and chemistry. We also give a triply efficient scheme for the set of all $n$-qubit Pauli observables. Our protocols for these tasks use two-copy measurements, which is necessary: sample-efficient schemes are provably impossible using only single-copy measurements. Finally, we give a shadow tomography protocol that compresses an $n$-qubit quantum state into a $\poly(n)$-sized classical representation, from which one can extract the expected value of any of the $4^n$ Pauli observables in $\poly(n)$ time, up to a small constant error. View details
    Exponential Quantum Speedup in Simulating Coupled Classical Oscillators
    Dominic Berry
    Rolando Somma
    Nathan Wiebe
    Physical Review X, 13(2023), pp. 041041
    Preview abstract We present a quantum algorithm for simulating the classical dynamics of 2^n coupled oscillators (e.g., 2^n masses coupled by springs). Our approach leverages a mapping between the Schrodinger equation and Newton's equations for harmonic potentials such that the amplitudes of the evolved quantum state encode the momenta and displacements of the classical oscillators. When individual masses and spring constants can be efficiently queried, and when the initial state can be efficiently prepared, the complexity of our quantum algorithm is polynomial in n, almost linear in the evolution time, and sublinear in the sparsity. As an example application, we apply our quantum algorithm to efficiently estimate the kinetic energy of an oscillator at any time, for a specification of the problem that we prove is \BQP-complete. Thus, our approach solves a potentially practical application with an exponential speedup over classical computers. Finally, we show that under similar conditions our approach can efficiently simulate more general classical harmonic systems with 2^n modes. View details
    No Results Found