Adrian Wong

Adrian Wong

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    Learning to Fold Real Garments with One Arm: A Case Study in Cloud-Based Robotics Research
    Ryan Hoque
    Kaushik Shivakumar
    Shrey Aeron
    Gabriel Deza
    Aditya Ganapathi
    Andy Zeng
    Ken Goldberg
    IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS)(2022) (to appear)
    Preview abstract Autonomous fabric manipulation is a longstanding challenge in robotics, but evaluating progress is difficult due to the cost and diversity of robot hardware. Using Reach, a new cloud robotics platform that enables low-latency remote execution of control policies on physical robots, we present the first systematic benchmarking of fabric manipulation algorithms on physical hardware. We develop 4 novel learning-based algorithms that model expert actions, keypoints, reward functions, and dynamic motions, and we compare these against 4 learning-free and inverse dynamics algorithms on the task of folding a crumpled T-shirt with a single robot arm. The entire lifecycle of data collection, model training, and policy evaluation is performed remotely without physical access to the robot workcell. Results suggest a new algorithm combining imitation learning with analytic methods achieves 84% of human-level performance on the folding task. View details
    Preview abstract Large pretrained (e.g., "foundation") models exhibit distinct capabilities depending on the domain of data they are trained on. While these domains are generic, they may only barely overlap. For example, visual-language models (VLMs) are trained on Internet-scale image captions, but large language models (LMs) are further trained on Internet-scale text with no images (e.g., spreadsheets, SAT questions, code). As a result, these models store different forms of commonsense knowledge across different domains. In this work, we show that this diversity is symbiotic, and can be leveraged through Socratic Models (SMs): a modular framework in which multiple pretrained models may be composed zero-shot i.e., via multimodal-informed prompting, to exchange information with each other and capture new multimodal capabilities, without requiring finetuning. With minimal engineering, SMs are not only competitive with state-of-the-art zero-shot image captioning and video-to-text retrieval, but also enable new applications such as (i) answering free-form questions about egocentric video, (ii) engaging in multimodal assistive dialogue with people (e.g., for cooking recipes) by interfacing with external APIs and databases (e.g., web search), and (iii) robot perception and planning. Prototypes are available at socraticmodels.github.io View details
    Implicit Behavioral Cloning
    Pete Florence
    Corey Lynch
    Andy Zeng
    Oscar Ramirez
    Laura Downs
    Igor Mordatch
    CoRL(2021)
    Preview abstract We find that across a wide range of robot policy learning scenarios, treating supervised policy learning with an implicit model generally performs better, on average, than commonly used explicit models. We present extensive experiments on this finding, and we provide both intuitive insight and theoretical arguments distinguishing the properties of implicit models compared to their explicit counterparts, particularly with respect to approximating complex, potentially discontinuous and multi-valued (set-valued) functions. On robotic policy learning tasks we show that implicit behavioral cloning policies with energy-based models (EBM) often outperform common explicit (Mean Square Error, or Mixture Density) behavioral cloning policies, including on tasks with high-dimensional action spaces and visual image inputs. We find these policies provide competitive results or outperform state-of-the-art offline reinforcement learning methods on the challenging human-expert tasks from the D4RL benchmark suite, despite using no reward information. In the real world, robots with implicit policies can learn complex and remarkably subtle behaviors on contact-rich tasks from human demonstrations, including tasks with high combinatorial complexity and tasks requiring 1mm precision. View details
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