Hayes Raffle

Hayes Raffle

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    People in books: using a FlashCam to become part of an interactive book for connected reading
    Sean Follmer
    Rafael (Tico) Ballagas
    Mirjana Spasojevic
    Hiroshi Ishii
    Proceedings of the ACM 2012 conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, ACM, New York, NY, USA, pp. 685-694
    Preview
    Reading, Laughing, and Connecting with Young Children
    Tico Ballagas
    Joseph Kaye
    Connecting Families, Springer, new york(2012), pp. 161-174
    Preview abstract In this chapter, we report on three projects that focus on storybook reading as a way to improve distance communication with very young children. “Connected Reading” builds on the insight that communication technologies for families with young children need to focus on play rather than conversations, and that having a shared activity can help structure this play. Our prototypes span a range of embodiments, from mobile video conferencing with physical books, to eBooks, and finally to video conferencing enhanced with depth camera technology. Our findings suggest guidelines to improve family communication with young children. View details
    StoryFaces: pretend-play with ebooks to support social-emotional storytelling
    Kimiko Ryokai
    Robert Kowalski
    Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, ACM, New York, NY, USA(2012), pp. 125-133
    Preview
    Electric Agents: Combining Television and Mobiles for an Educational Game.
    Rafael Ballagas
    Glenda Revelle
    Hiroshi Horii
    Koichi Mori
    ACM International Conference on Interaction Design and Children (IDC) 2011, ACM, 1600 Amphitheater Parkway
    Preview
    Sticking Together: Handcrafting Personalized Communication Interfaces.
    Natalie Freed
    Jie Qi
    Adam Stephenson
    Leah Buechley
    Cynthia Breazeal
    ACM International Conference on Interaction Design and Children (IDC) 2011, ACM
    Preview abstract We present I/O Stickers, adhesive sensors and actuators thatchildren can use to create personalized remote communicationinterfaces. By attaching I/O Stickers to special greeting cards,children can invent ways to communicate with long-distanceloved ones with personalized, connected messages. Childrendecorate these cards with their choice of craft materials, creativelyexpressing themselves while making a functioning interface. Thelow-bandwidth connections leave room for children to design notonly the look and function, but also the signification of theconnections. We describe the design of the I/O Stickers, a varietyof artifacts children have created, and future directions for thetoolkit. Preliminary results indicate that I/O Stickers are beginningto make a space for creative learning about communication and tomake keeping in touch playful and meaningful. View details
    Hello, Is Grandma There? StoryVisit: Family Video Chat and Connected E-Books.
    Glenda Revelle
    Koichi Mori
    ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011., ACM
    Preview abstract StoryVisit allows children and long-distance adults to experience a sense of togetherness by reading children’s story books together over a distance. StoryVisit combines video conferencing and connected books: remote grown-up and child readers can see and hear each other, and can also see and control the same e-book. We report on research with 61 families – over 200 users including parents, children and long-distance readers – who used StoryVisit in their homes with a long-distance reader for at least one reading session. In addition, we report qualitative findings regarding nineteen of the families who participated in telephone interviews and four families who were monitored and interviewed by researchers at home. Results show that connected e-book video chat sessions last about five times as long as the typical video chats reported in previous research on families with young children. Moreover, the addition of an animated character increased session lengths by another 50%. StoryVisit usage peaked for families with three year olds, showing that sustained distance interactions with very young children are possible if communication technologies incorporate joint activities that engage children and adults. View details
    Pop Goes The Cell Phone: Asynchronous Messaging For Preschoolers.
    Rafael Ballagas
    Glenda Revelle
    Koichi Mori
    ACM International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, ACM(2011)
    Preview abstract This paper outlines a series of experiments to develop asynchronous messaging systems for preschool aged children. Three unique systems build on a foundational design called Toaster, a jack-in-the box toy with embedded mobile phone that allows children to playfully take and share electronic media. Orange Toaster allows children to create and share self-portraits; Family Toast allows children to browse family photos with physical tokens, and shares their self-portrait reactions with remote family members; Play with Elmo allows children and distant adults to asynchronously share playful video messages. Observations with over 30 children suggest that asynchronous photographic or video messaging with very young children is possible. The results of these studies indicate specific guidelines including (1) children's UI's need to be playful and immediate (2) UI designs for children should create the “here and now” feel of real-time interaction, and (3) adults' UI's must provide emotionally meaningful feedback from children to engage adult users. View details
    Communiclay: A Modular System for Tangible Telekinetic Communication
    Ruibing Wang
    Karim Seada
    Hiroshi Ishii
    ACM International Conference on Interaction Design and Children (IDC) 2011, ACM, 1600 Amphitheater Parkway
    Preview abstract We introduce Communiclay, a modular construction system for tangible kinetic communication of gesture and form over a distance. Users assemble a number of Communiclay nodes into unique configurations, connect their creations to each others’ Communiclay creations on a network, and then physically deform one creation to synchronously output those same gestures on the other networked creations. Communiclay builds on trends in tangible interfaces and explores the ways in which future actuated materials can enable a variety of tangible interfaces. We present applications that stem from past research in tangible media, and describe explorations that address ways in which people make meaning of remote communication through gesture and dynamic physical form. Our hypothesis is that current research in programmable matter will eventually converge with UI research; Communiclay demonstrates that we can begin to explore design and social issues with today’s technologies. View details
    StoryFaces: Children Exploring Emotional Expressions in Storytelling with Video
    Kimiko Ryokai
    Robert Kowalski
    ACM International Conference on Interaction Design and Children (IDC) 2011
    Preview abstract We introduce StoryFaces, a new composition and storytelling tool for children to explore the role of emotional expressions in children’s narrative. StoryFaces invites children to record emotional expressions and then automatically composes these recordings in storybook illustrations. After children watch their faces bring a story to life, they can “go backstage” to play with the story by rearranging the videos and altering the story text. This paper presents our exploratory prototype, a design rationale that focuses on supporting children’s emotional growth through storytelling play and reflection, and reports on a formative evaluation with two children ages 4-6. Results from the evaluation suggest that children ages 4-6 are engaged in the activity, are excited to create a variety of emotional expressions, find the narratives funny yet clear, and work to re-craft and reinterpret story meanings through iterative editing and play with both video and textual content. Our goal is to provoke new ideas about how pretend play with digital tools can Copyright is held by the author/owner(s). empower young children in a narrative process. View details
    Pokaboo: A Networked Toy for Distance Communication and Play.
    Koichi Mori
    Rafael Ballagas
    Mirjana Spasojevic
    ACM International Conference on Interaction Design and Children (IDC) 2011, ACM
    Preview abstract How might we build on the physical interactivity of children's play to help children communicate over a distance? Pokaboo is a networked toy for children ages 2-5 to physically play even when they are far apart. Envisioned almost like a low-frame rate video chat, the system combines physically-linked buttons with photo and audio communication. A child will press a button down to take their own photo, and their self-portrait will pop up on their partner's device. The device was tested with both photo sharing and video chat. Children were most engaged when the buttons were part of a mobile video chat, where one child could press a button down and see their partner's button pop up in front of their far-away playmate. When the playmate responded with a button press, their button would magically pop up in front of them, in a form of physical call-and-response. Pokaboo shows how networked toys can help children to form engaging connections through physical play over a distance. View details
    You're in control: a urinary user interface
    Dan Maynes-Aminzade
    CHI Extended Abstracts(2003), pp. 986-987