Jump to Content
Chen Sun

Chen Sun

Please visit my homepage for more about my research.
Authored Publications
Google Publications
Other Publications
Sort By
  • Title
  • Title, desc
  • Year
  • Year, desc
    AVATAR: Unconstrained Audiovisual Speech Recognition
    Valentin Gabeur
    Paul Hongsuck Seo
    Karteek Alahari
    Interspeech (2022)
    Preview abstract Audio-visual automatic speech recognition (AV-ASR) is an extension of ASR that incorporates visual cues, often from the movements of a speaker's mouth. Unlike works that simply focus on the lip motion, we investigate the contribution of entire visual frames (visual actions, objects, background etc.). This is particularly useful for unconstrained videos, where the speaker is not necessarily visible. To solve this task, we propose a new sequence-to-sequence AudioVisual ASR TrAnsformeR (AVATAR) which is trained end-to-end from spectrograms and full-frame RGB. To prevent the audio stream from dominating training, we propose different word-masking strategies, thereby encouraging our model to pay attention to the visual stream. We demonstrate the contribution of the visual modality on the How2 AV-ASR benchmark, especially in the presence of simulated noise, and show that our model outperforms all other prior work by a large margin. Finally, we also create a new, real-world test bed for AV-ASR called VisSpeech, which demonstrates the contribution of the visual modality under challenging audio conditions. View details
    Preview abstract YouTube users looking for instructions for a specific task may spend a long time browsing content trying to find the right video that matches their needs. Creating a visual summary (abridged version of a video) provides viewers with a quick overview and massively reduces search time. In this work, we focus on summarizing nstructional videos, an under-explored area of video summarization. In comparison to generic videos, instructional videos can be parsed into semantically meaningful segments that correspond to important steps of the demonstrated task. Existing video summarization datasets rely on manual frame-level annotations, making them subjective and limited in size. To overcome this, we first automatically generate pseudo summaries for a corpus of instructional videos by exploiting two key assumptions: (i) relevant steps are likely to appear in multiple videos of the same task (Task Relevance), and (ii) they are more likely to be described by the demonstrator verbally (Cross-Modal Saliency). We propose an instructional video summarization network that combines a context-aware temporal video encoder and a segment scoring transformer. Using pseudo summaries as weak supervision, our network constructs a visual summary for an instructional video given only video and transcribed speech. To evaluate our model, we collect a high-quality test set, WikiHow Summaries, by scraping WikiHow articles that contain video demonstrations and visual depictions of steps allowing us to obtain the ground-truth summaries. We outperform several baselines and a state-of-the-art video summarization model on this new benchmark. View details
    Multiview Transformers for Video Recognition
    Xuehan Xiong
    Anurag Arnab
    Zhichao Lu
    Mi Zhang
    The IEEE / CVF Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition Conference (CVPR) (2022)
    Preview abstract Video understanding often requires reasoning at multiple spatiotemporal resolutions. To this end, we present Multiview Transformers for Video Recognition (MTV). Our model consists of separate encoders to represent different views of the input video with lateral connections to fuse information across views. MTV consistently performs better than single-view counterparts in terms of accuracy and computational cost across a range of model sizes, and can effectively leverage different transformer encoder architectures. We present thorough ablation studies of our model and achieve state-of-the-art results on five standard datasets. We will release code and pretrained checkpoints to facilitate further research. View details
    Masking Modalities for Cross-modal Video Retrieval
    Valentin Gabeur
    Karteek Alahari
    Winter Conference on Applications of Computer Vision (WACV) (2022) (to appear)
    Preview abstract Pre-training on large scale unlabelled datasets has shown impressive performance improvements in the fields of computer vision and natural language processing. Given the advent of large-scale instructional video datasets, a common strategy for pre-training video encoders is to use the accompanying speech as weak supervision. However, as speech is used to supervise the pre-training, it is never seen by the video encoder, which does not learn to process that modality. We address this drawback of current pre-training methods, which fail to exploit the rich cues in spoken language. Our proposal is to pre-train a video encoder using all the available video modalities as supervision, namely, appearance, sound, and transcribed speech. We mask an entire modality in the input and predict it using the other two modalities. This encourages each modality to collaborate with the others, and our video encoder learns to process appearance and audio as well as speech. We show the superior performance of our `modality masking' pre-training approach for video retrieval on the How2R, YouCook2 and Condensed Movies datasets. View details
    Learning Audio-Video Modalities from Image Captions
    Paul Hongsuck Seo
    Anja Hauth
    Santiago Manen
    European Conference on Computer Vision (2022)
    Preview abstract There has been a recent explosion of large-scale image-text datasets, as images with alt-text captions can be easily obtained online.Obtaining large-scale, high quality data for video in the form of text-video and text-audio pairs however, is more challenging. To close this gap we propose a new video mining pipeline which involves transferring captions from image captioning datasets to video clips with no additional manual effort. Using this pipeline, we create a new large-scale, weakly labelled audio-video captioning dataset consisting of millions of paired clips and captions. We show that training a multimodal transformer based model on this data achieves competitive performance on video retrieval and video captioning, matching or even outperforming HowTo100M pretraining with 20x fewer clips. We also show that our mined clips are suitable for text-audio pretraining, and achieve state of the art results for the task of audio retrieval. View details
    Preview abstract We focus on contrastive methods for self-supervised video representation learning. A common paradigm in contrastive learning is to construct positive pairs by sampling different data views for the same instance, with different data instances as negatives. These methods implicitly assume a set of representational invariances to the view selection mechanism (eg, sampling frames with temporal shifts), which may lead to poor performance on downstream tasks which violate these invariances (fine-grained video action recognition that would benefit from temporal information). To overcome this limitation, we propose an 'augmentation aware' contrastive learning framework, where we explicitly provide a sequence of augmentation parameterisations (such as the values of the time shifts used to create data views) as composable augmentation encodings (CATE) to our model when projecting the video representations for contrastive learning. We show that representations learned by our method encode valuable information about specified spatial or temporal augmentation, and in doing so also achieve state-of-the-art performance on a number of video benchmarks. View details
    Preview abstract Humans perceive the world by concurrently processing and fusing high-dimensional inputs from multiple modalities such as vision and audio. Machine perception models, in stark contrast, are typically modality-specific and optimised for unimodal benchmarks. A common approach for building multimodal models is to simply combine multiple of these modality-specific architectures using late-stage fusion of final representations or predictions (\textit{`late-fusion'}). Instead, we propose a new architecture that learns to model both unimodal and cross-modal information at earlier stages, without imposing any modality specific priors. We investigate two pathways for the exchange of cross-modal information, \textit{vertical attention} (by restricting crossmodal fusion to certain layers) and \textit{horizontal attention}, via the use of `fusion bottleneck' tokens, that encourage the model to extract and exchange relevant information between modalities in an efficient manner. We conduct thorough ablation studies, and achieve state-of-the-art results on multiple audio-visual classification benchmarks including Audioset, Epic-Kitchens and VGGSound. All code and models will be released. View details
    Multi-modal Transformer for Video Retrieval
    Valentin Gabeur
    Karteek Alahari
    European Conference on Computer Vision (ECCV) (2020)
    Preview abstract The task of retrieving video content relevant to natural language queries plays a critical role in effectively handling internet-scale datasets. Most of the existing methods for this caption-to-video retrieval problem do not fully exploit cross-modal cues present in video. Furthermore, they aggregate per-frame visual features with limited or no temporal information. In this paper, we present a multi-modal transformer to jointly encode the different modalities in video, which allows each of them to attend to the others. The transformer architecture is also leveraged to encode and model the temporal information. On the natural language side, we investigate the best practices to jointly optimize the language embedding together with the multi-modal transformer. This novel framework allows us to establish state-of-the-art results for video retrieval on three datasets. View details
    Preview abstract Contrastive learning between multiple views of the data has recently dominated the field of self-supervised representation learning. Despite its success, the influence of different views is less studied. In this paper, we step towards understanding the importance of view selection with empirical analysis, and argue that we should reduce the mutual information (MI) between contrasted views while keeping their information bits that are relevant to the downstream task. To verify it, we devise an unsupervised and a semi-supervised framework to learn good views from the perspective of color space. We also view data augmentation as a way to reduce MI, and show that increasing data augmentation leads to decreasing MI but improved downstream classification accuracy. As a by-product, a new state-of-the-art accuracy is achieved on ImageNet linear readoff benchmark with ResNet-50. View details
    Preview abstract Can we guess human action from dialogue alone? In this work we investigate the link between spoken words and actions in movies. We note that movie scripts describe actions, as well as contain the speech of characters and hence can be used to learn this correlation with no additional supervision. We train a speech to action classifier on 1k movie scripts downloaded from IMSDb and show that such a classifier performs well for certain classes, and when applied to the speech segments of a large \textit{unlabelled} movie corpus (288k videos, 188M speech segments), provides weak labels for over 800k video clips. By training on these video clips, we demonstrate superior action recognition performance on standard action recognition benchmarks, without using a single labelled action example. View details
    Preview abstract Despite the recent advances in video classification, progress in spatio-temporal action recognition has lagged behind. A major contributing factor has been the prohibitive cost of annotating videos frame-by-frame. In this paper, we present a spatio-temporal action recognition that is trained with only video-level labels, which are significantly easier to annotate, and can even be mined automatically (subject to some label noise). Our method leverages per-frame person detectors which have been trained on large image datasets within a Multiple Instance Learning framework. We show how we can apply our method in cases where the standard Multiple Instance Learning assumption, that each bag contains at least one instance with the specified label, is invalid using a novel probabilistic variant of MIL. Furthermore, we report the first weakly-supervised results on the AVA dataset and state-of-the-art results among weakly-supervised methods on UCF101-24. View details
    Preview abstract Self-supervised learning has become increasingly important to leverage the abundance of unlabeled data available on platforms like YouTube. Whereas most existing approaches learn low-level representations, we propose a joint visual-linguistic model to learn high-level features without any explicit supervision. In particular, inspired by its recent success in language modeling, we build upon the BERT model to learn bidirectional joint distributions over sequences of visual and linguistic tokens, derived from vector quantization of video data and off-the-shelf speech recognition outputs, respectively. We use VideoBERT in numerous tasks, including action classification and video captioning. We show that it can be applied directly to open-vocabulary classification, and confirm that large amounts of training data and cross-modal information are critical to performance. Furthermore, we outperform the state-of-the-art on video captioning, and quantitative results verify that the model learns high-level semantic features. View details
    Preview abstract We present a method that learns to integrate temporal information, from a learned dynamics model, with ambiguous visual information, from a learned vision model, in the context of interacting agents. Our method is based on a graph-structured variational recurrent neural network (Graph-VRNN), which is trained end-to-end to infer the current state of the (partially observed) world, as well as to forecast future states. We show that our method outperforms various baselines on two sports datasets, one based on real basketball trajectories, and one generated by a soccer game engine. View details
    Preview abstract This paper focuses on multi-person action forecasting in videos. More precisely, given a history of H previous frames, the goal is to detect actors and to predict their future actions for the next T frames. Our approach jointly models temporal and spatial interactions among different actors by constructing a recurrent graph, using actor proposals obtained with Faster R-CNN as nodes. Our method learns to select a subset of discriminative relations without requiring explicit supervision, thus enabling us to tackle challenging visual data. We refer to our model as Discriminative Relational Recurrent Network (DRRN). Evaluation of action prediction on AVA demonstrates the effectiveness of our proposed method compared to simpler baselines. Furthermore, we significantly improve performance on the task of early action classification on J-HMDB, from the previous SOTA of 48% to 60%. View details
    Preview abstract Humans easily recognize object parts and their hierarchical structure by watching how they move; they can then predict how each part moves in the future. In this paper, we propose a novel formulation that simultaneously learns a hierarchical, disentangled object representation and a dynamics model for object parts from unlabeled videos. Our Parts, Structure, and Dynamics (PSD) model learns to, first, recognize the object parts via a layered image representation; second, predict hierarchy via a structural descriptor that composes low-level concepts into a hierarchical structure; and third, model the system dynamics by predicting the future. Experiments on multiple real and synthetic datasets demonstrate that our PSD model works well on all three tasks: segmenting object parts, building their hierarchical structure, and capturing their motion distributions. View details
    Inferring Context from Pixels for Multimodal Image Classification
    Manan Shah
    Krishnamurthy Viswanathan
    Ariel Fuxman
    Zhen Li
    Aleksei Timofeev
    Proceedings of the 28th ACM International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management, ACM (2019) (to appear)
    Preview abstract Image classification models take image pixels as input and predict labels in a predefined taxonomy. While contextual information (e.g. text surrounding an image) can provide valuable orthogonal signals to improve classification, the typical setting in literature assumes the unavailability of text and thus focuses on models that rely purely on pixels. In this work, we also focus on the setting where only pixels are available in the input. However, we demonstrate that if we predict textual information from pixels, we can subsequently use the predicted text to train models that improve overall performance. We propose a framework that consists of two main components: (1) a phrase generator that maps image pixels to a contextual phrase, and (2) a multimodal model that uses textual features from the phrase generator and visual features from the image pixels to produce labels in the output taxonomy. The phrase generator is trained using web-based query-image pairs to incorporate contextual information associated with each image and has a large output space. We evaluate our framework on diverse benchmark datasets (specifically, the WebVision dataset for evaluating multi-class classification and OpenImages dataset for evaluating multi-label classification), demonstrating performance improvements over approaches based exclusively on pixels and showcasing benefits in prediction interpretability. We additionally present results to demonstrate that our framework provides improvements in few-shot learning of minimally labeled concepts. We further demonstrate the unique benefits of the multimodal nature of our framework by utilizing intermediate image/text co-embeddings to perform baseline zero-shot learning on the ImageNet dataset. View details
    Preview abstract In this paper, we study the task of image retrieval, where the input query is specified in the form of an image plus some text that describes desired modifications to the input image. For example, we may present an image of the Eiffel tower, and ask the system to find images which are visually similar but are modified in small ways, such as being taken at nighttime instead of during the day. To tackle this task, we learn a similarity metric between a target image and a source image plus source text, an embedding and composing function such that target image feature is close to the source image plus text composition feature. We propose a new way to combine image and text using such function that is designed for the retrieval task. We show this outperforms existing approaches on 3 different datasets, namely Fashion-200k, MIT-States and a new synthetic dataset we create based on CLEVR. We also show that our approach can be used to classify input queries, in addition to image retrieval. View details
    Preview abstract Extracting and predicting object structure and dynamics from videos without supervision is a major challenge in machine learning. To address this challenge, we adopt a keypoint-based image representation and learn a stochastic dynamics model of the keypoints. Future frames are reconstructed from the keypoints and a reference frame. By modeling dynamics in the keypoint coordinate space, we achieve stable learning and avoid compounding of errors in pixel space. Our method improves upon unstructured representations both for pixel-level video prediction and for downstream tasks requiring object-level understanding of motion dynamics. We evaluate our model on diverse datasets: a multi-agent sports dataset, the Human3.6M dataset, and datasets based on continuous control tasks from the DeepMind Control Suite. The spatially structured representation outperforms unstructured representations on a range of motion-related tasks such as object tracking, action recognition and reward prediction. View details
    Preview abstract Despite the steady progress in video analysis led by the adoption of convolutional neural networks (CNNs), the relative improvement has been less drastic as that in 2D static image classification. Three main challenges exist including spatial (image) feature representation, temporal information representation, and model/computation complexity. It was recently shown by Carreira and Zisserman that 3D CNNs, inflated from 2D networks and pretrained on ImageNet, could be a promising way for spatial and temporal representation learning. However, as for model/computation complexity, 3D CNNs are much more expensive than 2D CNNs and prone to overfit. We seek a balance between speed and accuracy by building an effective and efficient video classification system through systematic exploration of critical network design choices. In particular, we show that it is possible to replace many of the 3D convolutions by low-cost 2D convolutions. Rather surprisingly, best result (in both speed and accuracy) is achieved when replacing the 3D convolutions at the bottom of the network, suggesting that temporal representation learning on high-level semantic features is more useful. Our conclusion generalizes to datasets with very different properties. When combined with several other cost-effective designs including separable spatial/temporal convolution and feature gating, our system results in an effective video classification system that that produces very competitive results on several action classification benchmarks (Kinetics, Something-something, UCF101 and HMDB), as well as two action detection (localization) benchmarks (JHMDB and UCF101-24). View details
    Preview abstract Current state-of-the-art approaches for spatio-temporal action localization rely on detections at the frame level and model temporal context with 3D ConvNets. Here, we go one step further and model spatio-temporal relations to capture the interactions between human actors, relevant objects and scene elements essential to differentiate similar human actions. Our approach is weakly supervised and mines the relevant elements automatically with an actor-centric relational network (ACRN). ACRN computes and accumulates pair-wise relation information from actor and global scene features, and generates relation features for action classification. It is implemented as neural networks and can be trained jointly with an existing action detection system. We show that ACRN outperforms alternative approaches which capture relation information, and that the proposed framework improves upon the state-of-the-art performance on JHMDB and AVA. A visualization of the learned relation features confirms that our approach is able to attend to the relevant relations for each action. View details
    The iNaturalist Species Classification and Detection Dataset
    Grant Van Horn
    Oisin Mac Aodha
    Yin Cui
    Alex Shepard
    Pietro Perona
    Serge Belongie
    CVPR (2018)
    Preview abstract Existing image classification datasets used in computer vision tend to have a uniform distribution of images across object categories. In contrast, the natural world is heavily imbalanced, as some species are more abundant and easier to photograph than others. To encourage further progress in challenging real world conditions we present the iNaturalist species classification and detection dataset, consisting of 859,000 images from over 5,000 different species of plants and animals. It features visually similar species, captured in a wide variety of situations, from all over the world. Images were collected with different camera types, have varying image quality, feature a large class imbalance, and have been verified by multiple citizen scientists. We discuss the collection of the dataset and present extensive baseline experiments using state-of-the-art computer vision classification and detection models. Results show that current nonensemble based methods achieve only 67% top one classification accuracy, illustrating the difficulty of the dataset. Specifically, we observe poor results for classes with small numbers of training examples suggesting more attention is needed in low-shot learning. View details
    Preview abstract This paper introduces a video dataset of spatio-temporally localized Atomic Visual Actions (AVA). The AVA dataset densely annotates 80 atomic visual actions in 430 15-minute video clips, where actions are localized in space and time, resulting in 1.58M action labels with multiple labels per person occurring frequently. The key characteristics of our dataset are: (1) the definition of atomic visual actions, rather than composite actions; (2) precise spatio-temporal annotations with possibly multiple annotations for each person; (3) exhaustive annotation of these atomic actions over 15-minute video clips; (4) people temporally linked across consecutive segments; and (5) using movies to gather a varied set of action representations. This departs from existing datasets for spatio-temporal action recognition, which typically provide sparse annotations for composite actions in short video clips. We will release the dataset publicly. AVA, with its realistic scene and action complexity, exposes the intrinsic difficulty of action recognition. To benchmark this, we present a novel approach for action localization that builds upon the current state-of-the-art methods, and demonstrates better performance on JHMDB and UCF101-24 categories. While setting a new state of the art on existing datasets, the overall results on AVA are low at 15.6% mAP, underscoring the need for developing new approaches for video understanding. View details
    Preview abstract Transferring the knowledge learned from large scale datasets (e.g., ImageNet) via fine-tuning offers an effective solution for domain-specific fine-grained visual categorization (FGVC) tasks (e.g., recognizing bird species or car make & model). In such scenarios, data annotation often calls for specialized domain knowledge and thus difficult to scale. In this work, we first tackle a problem in large scale FGVC. Our method won first place in iNaturalist 2017 large scale species classification challenge. Central to the success of our approach is a training scheme that uses higher image resolution and deals with the long-tailed distribution of training data. Next, we study transfer learning via fine-tuning from large scale datasets to small scale, domainspecific FGVC datasets. We propose a measure to estimate domain similarity via Earth Mover’s Distance and demonstrate that transfer learning benefits from pre-training on a source domain that is similar to the target domain by this measure. Our proposed transfer learning outperforms ImageNet pre-training and obtains state-of-the-art results on multiple commonly used FGVC datasets. View details
    TURN TAP: Temporal Unit Regression Networks for Temporal Action Proposals
    Jiyang Gao
    Zhenheng Yang
    Kan Chen
    Ram Nevatia
    ICCV (2017)
    Preview abstract Temporal Action Proposal (TAP) generation is an important problem, as fast and accurate extraction of semantically important (e.g. human actions) segments from untrimmed videos is an important step for large-scale video analysis. We propose a novel Temporal Unit Regression Network (TURN) model. There are two salient aspects of TURN: (1) TURN jointly predicts action proposals and refines the temporal boundaries by temporal coordinate regression; (2) Fast computation is enabled by unit feature reuse: a long untrimmed video is decomposed into video units, which are reused as basic building blocks of temporal proposals. TURN outperforms the state-of-the-art methods under average recall (AR) by a large margin on THUMOS-14 and ActivityNet datasets, and runs at over 880 frames per second (FPS) on a TITAN X GPU. We further apply TURN as a proposal generation stage for existing temporal action localization pipelines, it outperforms state-of-the-art performance on THUMOS-14 and ActivityNet. View details
    TALL: Temporal Activity Localization via Language Query
    Jiyang Gao
    Zhenheng Yang
    Ram Nevatia
    ICCV (2017)
    Preview abstract This paper focuses on temporal localization of actions in untrimmed videos. Existing methods typically train classifiers for a pre-defined list of actions and apply them in a sliding window fashion. However, activities in the wild consist of a wide combination of actors, actions and objects; it is difficult to design a proper activity list that meets users' needs. We propose to localize activities by natural language queries. Temporal Activity Localization via Language (TALL) is challenging as it requires: (1) suitable design of text and video representations to allow cross-modal matching of actions and language queries; (2) ability to locate actions accurately given features from sliding windows of limited granularity. We propose a novel Cross-modal Temporal Regression Localizer (CTRL) to jointly model text query and video clips, output alignment scores and action boundary regression results for candidate clips. For evaluation, we adopt TaCoS dataset, and build a new dataset for this task on top of Charades by adding sentence temporal annotations, called Charades-STA. We also build complex sentence queries in Charades-STA for test. Experimental results show that CTRL outperforms previous methods significantly on both datasets. View details
    Preview abstract The success of deep learning in vision can be attributed to: (a) models with high capacity; (b) increased computational power; and (c) availability of large-scale labeled data. Since 2012, there have been significant advances in representation capabilities of the models and computational capabilities of GPUs. But the size of the biggest dataset has surprisingly remained constant. What will happen if we increase the dataset size by 10x or 100x? This paper takes a step towards clearing the clouds of mystery surrounding the relationship between enormous data and visual deep learning. By exploiting the JFT-300M dataset which has more than 375M noisy labels for 300M images, we investigate how the performance of current vision tasks would change if this data was used for representation learning. Our paper delivers some surprising (and some expected) findings. First, we find that the performance on vision tasks increases logarithmically based on volume of training data size. Second, we show that representation learning (or pre-training) still holds a lot of promise. One can improve performance on many vision tasks by just training a better base model. Finally, as expected, we present new state-of-the-art results for different vision tasks including image classification, object detection, semantic segmentation and human pose estimation. Our sincere hope is that this inspires vision community to not undervalue the data and develop collective efforts in building larger datasets. View details
    Preview abstract The goal of this paper is to serve as a guide for selecting a detection architecture that achieves the right speed/memory/accuracy balance for a given application and platform. To this end we investigate various ways to trade accuracy for speed and memory usage in modern convolutional object detection systems. A number of successful systems have been proposed in recent years, but apples-to-apples comparisons are difficult due to different base feature extractors (e.g., VGG, Residual Networks), different default image resolutions, as well as different hardware and software platforms. We present a unified implementation of the Faster R-CNN~\cite{ren2015faster}, R-FCN~\cite{dai2016r} and SSD~\cite{liu2015ssd} systems, which we view as ``meta-architectures'' and trace out the speed/accuracy trade-off curve created by using alternative feature extractors and varying other critical parameters such as image size within each of these meta-architectures. On one extreme end of this spectrum where speed and memory are critical, we present a detector that runs at over 50 frames per second and can be deployed on a mobile device. On the opposite end in which accuracy is critical, we present a detector that achieves state-of-the-art performance measured on the COCO detection task. View details
    Preview abstract Label propagation is a popular semi-supervised learning technique that transfers information from labeled examples to unlabeled examples through a graph. Most label propagation methods construct a graph based on example-to-example similarity, assuming that the resulting graph connects examples that share similar labels. Unfortunately, examplelevel similarity is sometimes badly defined. For instance, two images may contain two different objects, but have similar overall appearance due to large similar background. In this case, computing similarities based on whole-image would fail propagating information to the right labels. This paper proposes a novel Instance-Level Label Propagation (ILLP) approach that integrates label propagation with multi-instance learning. Each example is treated as containing multiple instances, as in the case of an image consisting of multiple regions. We first construct a graph based on instancelevel similarity and then simultaneously identify the instances carrying the labels and propagate the labels across instances in the graph. Optimization is based on an iterative Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm. Experimental results on two benchmark datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach over several state-of-theart methods. View details
    G-RMI Object Detection
    Anoop Korattikara
    Menglong Zhu
    Vivek Rathod
    Zbigniew Wojna
    2nd ImageNet and COCO Visual Recognition Challenges Joint Workshop, Amsterdam (2016)
    Preview abstract We present our submission to the COCO 2016 Object Detection challenge. View details
    Webly-supervised Video Recognition by Mutually Voting for Relevant Web Images and Web Video Frames
    Chuang Gan
    Lixin Duan
    Boqing Gong
    European Conference on Computer Vision (ECCV) (2016) (to appear)
    Preview abstract Video recognition usually requires a large amount of training samples, which are expensive to be collected. An alternative and cheap solution is to draw from the large-scale images and videos from the Web. With modern search engines, the top ranked images or videos are usually highly correlated to the query, implying the potential to harvest the labeling-free Web images and videos for video recognition. However, there are two key difficulties that prevent us from using the Web data directly. First, they are typically noisy and may be from a completely different domain from that of users’ interest (e.g. cartoons). Second, Web videos are usually untrimmed and very lengthy, where some query-relevant frames are often hidden in between the irrelevant ones. A question thus naturally arises: to what extent can such noisy Web images and videos be utilized for labeling-free video recognition? In this paper, we propose a novel approach to mutually voting for relevant Web images and video frames, where two forces are balanced, i.e. aggressive matching and passive video frame selection. We validate our approach on three large-scale video recognition datasets. View details
    Preview abstract We address the problem of fine-grained action localization from temporally untrimmed web videos. We assume that only weak video-level annotations are available for training. The goal is to use these weak labels to identify temporal segments corresponding to the actions, and learn models that generalize to unconstrained web videos. We find that web images queried by action names serve as well-localized highlights for many actions, but are noisily labeled. To solve this problem, we propose a simple yet effective method that takes weak video labels and noisy image labels as input, and generates localized action frames as output. This is achieved by cross-domain transfer between video frames and web images, using pre-trained deep convolutional neural networks. We then use the localized action frames to train action recognition models with long short-term memory networks. We collect a fine-grained sports action data set FGA-240 of more than 130,000 YouTube videos. It has 240 fine-grained actions under 85 sports activities. Convincing results are shown on the FGA-240 data set, as well as the THUMOS 2014 localization data set with untrimmed training videos. View details
    No Results Found