Manas Tungare

Manas Tungare

I prototype, design, and build features for Google Search. I'm a front-end engineer with a passion for UX and a Ph.D. in Human-Computer Interaction.
Authored Publications
Google Publications
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    The Shoebox and the Safe: When Once-Personal Information Changes Hands
    Proceedings of the 5th International Workshop on Personal Information Management at CSCW 2012
    Preview abstract This paper presents several examples where one user’s personal information is accessed by another, without the consent of the owner, or without the capability of the owner to consent to such sharing. While intentional sharing of information at home as well as at work has been studied in detail, there is extremely limited understanding about the practices, dimensions and models of unintentional sharing. Laws and policies that were developed with paper and other nondigital archives in mind are being found to be inadequate for addressing the challenges that digital personal information brings. Worse, those laws are being enforced in inconsistent ways, prompting lawsuits. Posthumously shared information brings up questions that have not been addressed before. This paper starts by noting examples of posthumous sharing and sharing without consent, proposes models and dimensions for understanding it, and concludes by proposing research questions that need to be addressed by the wider PIM community. View details
    From Research Hypotheses to Practical Guidelines: A Proposal to Facilitate Researcher-Practitioner Interaction
    Pardha S. Pyla
    Catherine Grevet
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Proceedings of the CHI 2010 Workshop on Researcher-Practitioner Interaction
    Preview abstract In this paper, we describe the gulf that exists between research findings and their adoption in practice. We propose ideas that have the potential to increase the collaboration between researchers and practitioners to forge a symbiotic relationship between these two worlds. Our proposal includes highlighting industry constraints in academic HCI classes, encouraging researchers to present practical implications in papers, creating a collaborative platform between researchers and practitioners, and fostering strong relationships between HCI students and industry professionals. View details
    Collaborative Human Computation as a Means of Information Management
    Ben Hanrahan
    Ricardo Quintana-Castillo
    Michael Stewart
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Proceedings of the 2nd International Workshop on Collaborative Information Seeking at CSCW 2010
    Preview
    Sustainability of Bits, not just Atoms
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Pardha S. Pyla
    Ben Hanrahan
    Uma Murthy
    Ricardo Quintana-Castillo
    Proceedings of the CHI 2010 Workshop: Examining Appropriation, Re-use, and Maintenance for Sustainability
    Preview abstract In this paper, we discuss sustainability as it applies to digital artifacts and personal information. We continually create and/or receive new information items in the form of emails, files, photos, media, etc., but once these artifacts enter our information ecosystems, they stay permanently and are rarely deleted even if their intrinsic value is no longer the same as earlier. This impacts information seeking tasks negatively, as users must now learn to navigate a larger corpus of information, and leads to information overload. We describe the technological causes of information overload in the context of existing finding, filing, and refiling practices and information heirlooms. We conclude with an example of a solution that can address this challenge. View details
    You Scratch My Back and I’ll Scratch Yours: Combating Email Overload Collaboratively
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2009 Works-in-Progress
    Preview abstract Email is no longer perceived as a communication marvel, but rather as a constant source of information overload. Several studies have shown that accessing, managing, and archiving email threatens to affect users’ productivity. While several strategies and tools have been proposed to assuage this burden, none have attempted to empower users to fight the overload collaboratively. We hypothesize that despite differences in email management practices and frequencies of filing among users, there is some degree of similarity in the end-product of the organizational structures reached by those working in close cooperative roles (e.g. members of a research group, employees of an organization). In this paper, we describe a system that enables collaborators to share their filing strategies among themselves. Tags applied by one user are suggested to other recipients of the same email, thereby amortizing the cost of tagging and email management across all stakeholders. We wish to examine if such system support for semi-automated tagging reduces email overload for all users, and whether it leads to overall time savings for an entire enterprise as network effects propagate over time. View details
    Mental Workload in Personal Information Management: Understanding PIM Practices Across Multiple Devices
    Ph.D. Thesis, Dept. of Computer Science, Virginia Tech(2009)
    Preview abstract Multiple devices such as desktops, laptops, and cell phones are often used to manage users' personal information, such as files, calendars, contacts, emails, and bookmarks. This dissertation presents the results of two studies that examined users' mental workload in this context, especially when transitioning tasks from one device to another. In a survey of 220 knowledge workers, users reported high frustration with current devices' support for task migration, e.g. making files available on multiple machines. To investigate further, I conducted a controlled experiment with 18 participants. While they performed PIM tasks, I measured their mental workload using subjective measures and physiological measures. Some systems provide support for transitioning users' work between devices, or for using multiple devices together; I explored the impact of such support on mental workload and task performance. Participants performed three tasks (Files, Calendar, Contacts) with two treatment conditions each (lower and higher support for migrating tasks between devices.) This dissertation discusses my findings: workload measures obtained using the subjective NASA TLX scale were able to discriminate between tasks, but not between the two conditions in each task. Task-Evoked Pupillary Response, a continuous measure, was sensitive to changes within each task. For the Files task, a significant increase in workload was noted in the steps before and after task migration. Participants entered events faster into paper calendars than into an electronic calendar, though there was no observable difference in workload. For the Contacts task, task performance was equal, but mental workload was higher when no synchronization support was available between their cell phone and their laptop. Little to no correlation was observed between task performance and both workload measures, except in isolated instances. This suggests that neither task performance metrics nor workload assessments alone offer a complete picture of device usability in multi-device personal information ecosystems. Traditional usability metrics that focus on efficiency and effectiveness are necessary, but not sufficient, to evaluate such designs. Given participants' varying subjective perceptions of these systems and differences in task-evoked pupillary response, aspects of hot cognition such as emotion, pleasure, and likability show promise as important parameters in system evaluation. View details
    Mental Workload in Multi-Device Personal Information Management
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2009 Works-in-Progress
    Preview abstract Knowledge workers increasingly use multiple devices such as desktop computers, laptops, cell phones, and PDAs for personal information management (PIM) tasks. The use of several of these devices together creates higher task difficulty for users than when used individually (as reported in a recent survey we conducted). Prompted by this, we are conducting an experiment to study mental workload in multi-device scenarios. While mental workload has been shown to decrease at sub-task boundaries, it has not been studied if this still holds for sub-tasks performed on different devices. We hypothesize that the level of support provided by the system for task migration affects mental workload. Mental workload measurements can enable designers to isolate critical sub-tasks and redesign or optimize the user experience selectively. In addition, we believe that mental workload shows promise as a cross-tool, cross-task method of evaluating PIM tools, services and strategies, thus fulfilling a need expressed by several researchers in the area of personal information management. In this paper, we describe our ongoing experiment of measuring mental workload (via physiological as well as subjective measures) and its implications for users, designers and researchers in PIM. View details
    “Best If Used By”: Expiration Dates for Email
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Proceedings of the CHI 2009 Workshop on Interacting with Temporal Data
    Preview abstract We recognize the ephemerality of certain kinds of email received, and propose the use of an expiration date tag to indicate its lifetime. We hypothesize that the use of such a tag will assist personal information management (PIM) by providing users the ability to prune their email archives automatically, and take other actions as appropriate. We situate our proposal of expiration tags within the current PIM literature, focusing on the research problems they may help solve. We conclude with a discussion of how expiration tags can be set, retrieved, and acted upon by mail clients. View details
    Mental Workload at Transitions between Multiple Devices in Personal Information Management
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Proceedings of the PIM 2009 Workshop: Personal Information Intersections: What happens when PIM spaces overlap?
    Preview abstract Knowledge workers increasingly use multiple devices such as desktop computers, laptops, cell phones, and PDAs for personal information management (PIM) tasks. This paper presents the results of a study that examined users' mental workload in this context, especially when transitioning tasks from one device to another. In a preliminary survey of 220 knowledge workers, users reported high frustration with current devices' support for task migration, e.g. accessing files from multiple machines. To investigate further, we conducted a controlled experiment with 18 participants. While they performed PIM tasks, we measured their mental workload using subjective measures and physiological measures. Some systems provide support for transitioning users' work between devices, or for using multiple devices together; we explored the impact of such support on mental workload and task performance. Participants performed three tasks (Files, Calendar, Contacts) with two treatment conditions each (lower and higher support for migrating tasks between devices.) Workload measures obtained using the subjective NASA TLX scale were able to discriminate between tasks, but not between the two conditions in each task. Task-Evoked Pupillary Response, a continuous measure, was sensitive to changes within each task. For the Files task, a significant increase in workload was noted in the steps before and after task migration. Participants entered events faster into paper calendars than into an electronic calendar, though there was no observable difference in workload. For the Contacts task, time-on-task was equal, but mental workload was higher when no synchronization support was available between their cell phone and their laptop. Little to no correlation was observed between task performance and both workload measures, except in isolated instances. This suggests that neither task performance metrics nor workload assessments alone offer a complete picture of device usability in multi-device personal information ecosystems. Traditional usability metrics that focus on efficiency and effectiveness are necessary, but not sufficient, to evaluate such designs. Given participants' varying subjective perceptions of these systems and differences in task-evoked pupillary response, aspects of hot cognition such as emotion, pleasure, and likability show promise as important parameters in the evaluation of PIM systems. View details
    Continuous User Interfaces for Seamless Task Migration
    Pardha S. Pyla
    Jerome Holman
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCII 2009
    Automatic Genre-specific Text Classification
    Xiaoyan Yu
    Weiguo Fan
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Edward A. Fox
    William Cameron
    Lillian Cassel
    Encyclopedia of Data Warehousing and Mining, 2nd Edition(2008)
    Preview abstract Starting with a vast number of unstructured or semistructured documents, text mining tools analyze and sift through them to present to users more valuable information specific to their information needs. The technologies in text mining include information extraction, topic tracking, summarization, categorization/ classification, clustering, concept linkage, information visualization, and question answering [Fan, Wallace, Rich, & Zhang, 2006]. In this chapter, we share our hands-on experience with one specific text mining task — text classification [Sebastiani, 2002]. Information occurs in various formats, and some formats have a specific structure or specific information that they contain: we refer to these as `genres’. Examples of information genres include news items, reports, academic articles, etc. In this paper, we deal with a specific genre type, course syllabus. A course syllabus is such a genre, with the following commonly-occurring fields: title, description, instructor’s name, textbook details, class schedule, etc. In essence, a course syllabus is the skeleton of a course. Free and fast access to a collection of syllabi in a structured format could have a significant impact on education, especially for educators and life-long learners. Educators can borrow ideas from others’ syllabi to organize their own classes. It also will be easy for life-long learners to find popular textbooks and even important chapters when they would like to learn a course on their own. Unfortunately, searching for a syllabus on the Web using Information Retrieval [Baeza-Yates & Ribeiro-Neto, 1999] techniques employed by a generic search engine often yields too many non-relevant search result pages (i.e., noise) — some of these only provide guidelines on syllabus creation; some only provide a schedule for a course event; some have outgoing links to syllabi (e.g. a course list page of an academic department). Therefore, a well-designed classifier for the search results is needed, that would help not only to filter noise out, but also to identify more relevant and useful syllabi. View details
    Personal Information Ecosystems: Design Concerns for Net-Enabled Devices
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Pardha Pyla
    Steve Harrison
    Proceedings of the VI Latin American Web Congress - LA-Web 2008
    Preview abstract Today, with the proliferation of affordable computing, people use multiple devices to fulfill their information needs. Designers approach each device platform individually, without accounting for the other devices that users may also use. In many cases, the software applications on all the user's devices are designed to be functional replicates of each other, often with an emphasis on keeping their form and function consistent with the same application on other device platforms. In this paper, we present the idea of a personal information ecosystem, an analogy to biological ecosystems, which allows us to discuss the inter-relationships among users' devices. Using the examples of now-ubiquitous web-enabled devices, we discuss how considering the user's ecosystem of devices as a holistic design target gives designers and researchers a language to describe and discuss the design of applications that span multiple devices. View details
    An Exploratory Study of Calendar Use
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Computing Research Repository (CoRR)(2008)
    Preview abstract In this paper, we report on findings from an ethnographic study of how people use their calendars for personal information management (PIM). Our participants were faculty, staff and students who were not required to use or contribute to any specific calendaring solution, but chose to do so anyway. The study was conducted in three parts: first, an initial survey provided broad insights into how calendars were used; second, this was followed up with personal interviews of a few participants which were transcribed and content-analyzed; and third, examples of calendar artifacts were collected to inform our analysis. Findings from our study include the use of multiple reminder alarms, the reliance on paper calendars even among regular users of electronic calendars, and wide use of calendars for reporting and life-archival purposes. We conclude the paper with a discussion of what these imply for designers of interactive calendar systems and future work in PIM research. View details
    Automatic Syllabus Classification using Support Vector Machines
    Xiaoyan Yu
    Weiguo Fan
    Yubo Yuan
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Edward A. Fox
    William Cameron
    Lillian Cassel
    Handbook of Research on Text and Web Mining Technologies, Information Science Reference(2008)
    Preview abstract Syllabi are important educational resources. Gathering syllabi that are freely available and creating useful services on top of the collection presents great value for the educational community. However, searching for a syllabus on the Web using a generic search engine is an error-prone process and often yields too many irrelevant links. In this chapter, we describe our empirical study on automatic syllabus classification using Support Vector Machines (SVM) to filter noise out from search results. We describe various steps in the classification process from training data preparation, feature selection, and classifier building using SVMs. Empirical results are provided and discussed. We hope our reported work will also benefit people who are interested in building other genre-specific repositories. View details
    Thinking Outside the (Beige) Box: Personal Information Management Beyond the Desktop
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Proceedings of the 3rd Invitational Workshop on Personal Information Management, PIM 2008, a CHI 2008 workshop.
    Preview abstract As personal information ventures out with users from the desktop into the wild, researchers in personal information management are confronted with many new issues, and an amplification of the effects of existing issues. In this paper, we take a detailed look at the mobile context and how it differs from the stationary context, specifically in relation to PIM. Other changes in PIM, as information moves beyond the personal and into the social are also interesting to the PIM researcher. Based in part on comments made by participants of a study we conducted, and from our own experience in designing PIM for multiple devices and other scenarios, we highlight a few specific instances where existing PIM research falls short of addressing the issues, and pose a few open questions for the PIM community to consider as we move beyond the disappearing desktop. View details
    Automatic Syllabus Classification
    Xiaoyan Yu
    William Cameron
    GuoFang Teng
    Weiguo Fan
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Edward A. Fox
    Lillian Cassel
    In Proceedings of the Seventh ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries - JCDL 2007
    Towards a Syllabus Repository for Computer Science Courses
    Xiaoyan Yu
    William Cameron
    GuoFang Teng
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Edward Fox
    Weiguo Fan
    Lillian Cassel
    In Proceedings of the 38th Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE) 2007, ACM Press, New York, NY, pp. 55-59
    Using Automatic Metadata Extraction to Build a Structured Syllabus Repository
    Xiaoyan Yu
    Weiguo Fan
    Yubo Yuan
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Edward A. Fox
    William Cameron
    Lillian Cassel
    Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Asian Digital Libraries(2007)
    Understanding the Evolution of Users' Personal Information Management Practices
    In Proceedings of the Eleventh IFIP TC13 International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction - INTERACT 2007 Doctoral Consortium
    Preview abstract Information is being disseminated much faster than we can assimilate it, leading to information overload. In addition to desktop computers, users use a vast array of other devices to manage their information, which leads to information fragmentation. It has not yet been studied how users adapt their information management practices in response to the introduction of new devices into their personal information ecosystem. As part of my doctoral research, I plan to study this evolution, which is important for the design of next-generation devices and to establish future research directions in personal information management. View details
    Syncables: A Framework to Support Seamless Data Migration Across Multiple Platforms
    Pardha S. Pyla
    Miten Sampat
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Portable Information Devices (IEEE Portable) 2007
    Towards a Standardized Representation of Syllabi to Facilitate Sharing and Personalization of Digital Library Content
    Xiaoyan Yu
    GuoFang Teng
    Edward Fox
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Weiguo Fan
    Lillian Cassel
    Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Applications of Semantic Web Technologies for E-Learning (SW-EL)(2006)
    Personal Information Ecosystems and Implications for Design
    Pardha S. Pyla
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Steve Harrison
    Computing Research Repository (CoRR)(2006)
    Personal Information Ecosystems and Implications for Design
    Pardha S. Pyla
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Steve Harrison
    ACM Computing Research Repository(2006)
    Embodied Data Objects: Tangible Interfaces to Information Appliances
    Pardha S. Pyla
    Pradyut Bafna
    Vladimir Glina
    Wenjie Zhang
    Xiaoyan Yu
    Umut Balli
    Steve Harrison
    Proceedings of the 44th ACM SouthEast Conference (ACM SE 2006)
    Multiple User Interfaces: Why Consistency is Not Everything, and Seamless Task Migration is Key.
    Pardha S. Pyla
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Proceedings of the CHI 2006 Workshop on The Many Faces of Consistency in Cross-Platform Design.
    A Special Topics Course on Personal Information Management
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Pardha S. Pyla
    TR 06-26, Virginia Tech, Dept. of Computer Science(2006)
    Evaluation of a Location-Linked Notes System
    Ingrid Burbey
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Ananth Raghavan
    Proceedings of the 44th ACM SouthEast Conference (ACM SE 2006)
    An Online Teacher Peer Review System
    Aaron Powell
    Scott Turner
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Stephen H. Edwards
    Proceedings of the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education International Conference, SITE 2006.
    Defragmenting Information using the Syncables Framework
    Pardha S. Pyla
    Miten Sampat
    Manuel Pérez-Quiñones
    Proceedings of the 2nd Invitational Workshop on Personal Information Management at SIGIR 2006
    Performance Evaluation of Navigation Approaches on High-resolution Displays
    Suraj Menon
    Cyril Montabert
    Chris North
    Virginia Tech Dept. of Computer Science(2005)
    Genetic Algorithms and their use in the design of Evolvable Hardware
    Abhishek Joglekar
    IEEE Region 10 Conference for Student Papers (first runner-up prize)(2001)