Judy Chen

Judy Chen

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    From Dorms to Cubicles: How Recent Graduates Communicate
    David Choi
    Stephanie Wu
    Debra Lauterbach
    Aruna Balakrishnan
    48th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, IEEE(2015), pp. 2013-2022
    Preview abstract In a two-part field study, we studied the communication tool use of 29 college students and 20 recent college graduates. In comparing the two groups’ communication choices, we explored how transitioning from attending college to working full time impacts communication. We discuss how communication changes for recent college graduates in terms of both the content of their conversations, as well as the communication methods they use. We found that convenience plays a major role in the adoption and usage of communication tools, with participants preferring methods that were easily accessible at work, at home and in transit. We identify life changes recent graduates experience as they transition into emerging adulthood: the effect of being on a computer at work all day, changing social circles and scenes, being geographically distant from friends and family, and the desire for a professional persona. We discuss the impact of these changes on communication. View details
    From Interaction to Performance with Public Displays
    Paul Dourish
    Gillian R. Hayes
    Melissa Mazmanian
    Personal and Ubiquitous Computing(2014)
    Preview abstract Interacting with public displays involves more than what happens between individuals and the system; it also concerns how people experience others around and through those displays. In this paper, we use “performance” as an analytical lens for understanding experiences with a public display called rhythIMs and explore how displays shift social interaction through their mediation. By performance, we refer to a situation in which people are on display and orient themselves toward an audience that may be co-located, imagined, or virtual. To understand interaction with public displays, we use two related notions of collectives—audiences and groups—to highlight the ways in which people orient to each other through public displays. Drawing examples from rhythIMs, a public display that shows patterns of instant messaging and physical presence, we demonstrate that there can be multiple, heterogeneous audiences and show how people experience these different types of collectives in various ways. By taking a performance perspective, we are able to understand how audiences that were not physically co-present with participants still influenced participants’ interpretations and interactions with rhythIMs. This extension of the traditional notion of audience illuminates the roles audiences can play in a performance. View details
    'You've Got IMs!' How People Manage Concurrent Instant Messages
    Shailendra Rao
    Robin Jeffries
    Richard Boardman
    Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction. Part I, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg(2009), pp. 500-509
    Preview
    Towards a Framework of Publics: Re-Encountering Media Sharing and its User
    Silvia Lindtner
    Gillian R. Hayes
    Paul Dourish
    Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 18(2011), 5:1-5:23
    Preview abstract Design and evaluation of user-generated media production and sharing in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) often focus on formal and informal media sharing, such as communication within social networks, automatic notifications of activities, and the exchange of digital artifacts. However, conceptual tools for understanding how people relate to the audiences they reach through these systems are limited. The increasing interest in user-generated content in HCI demands the infusion of new methods and theories that explicitly engage the construction and use of media within and among large groups of individuals and systems. In this paper, we suggest that the notion of “publics,” drawn from media theory, provides useful insights into user-driven, social, and cultural forms of technology use and digital content creation. We illustrate this by employing the notion of publics to the findings from a two-month deployment of a mobile photo sharing platform in a youth housing community. The results of this empirical work coupled with a theoretical examination of publics stimulate reflection on prevailing interpretations of user-designer-reader roles. The paper provides an outlook for potentially new and productive ways of understanding interdependencies within those activities. Implications that can be drawn from this work concern the role of digital media creation and sharing for the formation of collectives and how people position themselves collectively in relation to larger social groups and societal norms. The analysis suggests fruitful crossovers among HCI, Media Theory and New Media Research by approaching the user as both consumer and producer of digital content. View details
    entrigue: Re-picturing the Home
    Alex S. Taylor
    Proceedings of the 5th Nordic conference on Human-computer interaction, ACM(2008), pp. 443-446
    Preview abstract Despite the volume of work that has been done on awareness displays, little has been articulated about the ways in which people achieve, understand and maintain awareness in their everyday routines. We reexamine awareness through the design of entrigue, a simple, lightweight photo display that captures the comings and goings in a home. Initial experiences of the system in use indicate that it offers a way of defamiliarizing a space, allowing a household to playfully re-experience the home and the ways in which they moved through it. By drawing attention to the idiosyncratic ways in which people make sense of cues and routines in the home, our results suggest that awareness incorporates a sense of how one engages with the environment, and highlights the notion of intrapersonal awareness as an awareness one can explore of oneself in and through this engagement. View details